Paradox Bay, Lake Placid// course, Maurice did do a short recording of announcements and shout outs to our sponsors. Curious? You can listen to it here.

whackamoleThe topic today — how do we re-ground ourselves when stress interferes with our roles as trainer-teacher-learners — was inspired by the article Stressed Out! What Can Teachers Do About It?  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl and Diane Huckabay. We deviated into the topic of staying organized, since being unorganized can lead to stress, and eventually got back to specific topics in the article itself.

 Resources mentioned during the show included:
 You can download the show HERE.
For more information on T is for Training, contact us at tisfortrainingshow at  or on twitter @tisfortraining

I came across this article in a Psychology Today blog post about the big elephant in the learning room, learning styles.

What are Learning Styles and Should Educators Use Them?  

Very interesting take including a great article reference to the Learning and Skills Research Centre (Great Britain) (LSRC) which produced a paper that indexes over 70 something different theories on how people gather, synthesize and process information.

Read and say what you think in the comments.

No by snigl3t on Flickr via CC Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

No by snigl3t on Flickr

Or You can get pearls at the 5 and dime.  Download the show HERE.

We started with a talk about creativity in the classroom for teachers and learners inspired by this article “Creative Teacher’ Is Not an Oxymoron,” (found by our Associate Producer and Very Usual Suspect Paul S. )  

The panel as I can remember:  Maurice Coleman, your host, (@baldgeekinmd) Paul Signorelli (@paulsignorelli)  Jules Shore (@7shores) and Andrea Snyder (@alsnyder02)

Then we talked tools to encourage that creativity and the creation of the T is for Training book club. Books to inspire you and make you better at doing your bliss.

Contact us at tisfortrainingshow at  or on twitter @tisfortraining

ChangeOn the call were Kate Kosturski, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Marc (in Calgary, Alberta), Donaldson and Maurice Coleman. (Marc and Donaldson were new to calling in!)

Kate started the conversation by talking about Pratt’s School of Information and Library Science becoming the Pratt Institute School of Information on October 5. (The announcement is here.) This brings up the difference between the i-schools (information) and the l-schools (library).

University of Maryland published Re-Envisioning the MLS: Findings, Issues, and Considerations,

Information on ischools (information schools) are available at

Eventually we moved to talk about libraries who will or will not cooperate with their neighboring libraries.

You can listen to the show here.

Rescued MouseThis show was one ALIGN (assess, learn, initiate, guide and nurture) and Trojan Mice and Miranda Organizations. On the call were Kate Kosturski, Maurice Coleman, Patti Poe, Paul Signorelli and Clark Quinn.  The show can be listened to here.

Baltimore - BelieveThis week’s topic – The Role Beliefs Play in Training-Teaching-Learning – was based on the Peter Brown, Henry Roediger, and Mark McDaniel book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful LearningThe conversation was lively, even though there are few notes here. Go ahead…give it a listen!

On the call were Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, Kelly Brannock (a first timer to the program), and Jules Shore. You can listen to the show here.

By the way, the seventh anniversary of T is for Training is on September 13, 2015. Yippee!

bunker or cat ?Paul Signorelli started the discussion about what we can do to help learners make the connection between learning and the audience they serve with that learning? For example, if you’re training people to do reference work, how do you train them to understand truly how to apply what they are learning to their workplace? Paul offered this blog post as inspiration: Clive Thompson on the New Literacy. Ideas included:

  • Role playing
  • Shadowing
  • Working a practical application of the skill
  • Project based learning
  • Having the work supervisor ask that the person (trainee) share what he/she learned
  • Learners need to come to the training with an idea of how they intend to use what they are going to learn
  • Ask people why they are attending the training and get them to articulate how they will use the information

We talked about asking for feedback, which not only helps the trainer, but also helps the learner understand the impact that the training had.  Feedback needs to gathered several weeks or months after the event, when people may have implemented what they have learned.

Can learners, who come together for a training, create a community that becomes a long-term support community? (An ongoing community of learning.) How about creating learning buddies?

Paul asked an interesting question, who owns your learning?

On the call were Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, Jules Shore, and Jill Hurst-Wahl. You can listen to the show here.

Your Lips Touching Mine in the PhotoboothMaurice Coleman and Jill Hurst-Wahl talked about the online tools they have used for face-to-face training. Those tools include:

  • Google Doc for providing a list of resources that can be useful to participants during and after training. (And Google Sites if that still exists.)
  • YouTube so people can see how to do something.
  • Organization’s content management system or WordPress site.
  • SlideShare for pointing handouts and slides.
  • Evernote for sharing handouts, etc.
  • URL shorteners.
  • Bookmark sites (e.g.,

Video tools:

You can listen to the recording here.

70 degreesThis was a rich conversation and the notes don’t do it justice. The topic was selected by Paul Signorelli based on this quote from Clark Quinn:

it’s not about content, it’s about experience. Are you designing experiences?

In our training sessions, how do we create experience? Do we provide the opportunity and space for people to transform?

If the learning environment isn’t what you want, rearrange the room. Ask learners – before the sessions ends – what needs to change in the environment and try to change it.  Quinn, who joined us on the call, noted that most evaluation forms do not really evaluate the impact of the training. Rather people evaluate the experience in terms of hot, cold, food, lighting, etc.

Who does experience correctly? We had multiple mentions of Disney. When we stop paying attention to the man behind the curtain (a reference to The Wizard of Oz), we’re truly involved in the experience.

We need to separate practitioners versus novices, so that the training/experience is appropriate. We need to consider how to scaffold the experience/learning.

Sometimes conferences are a place of reflection for people actively engaged, while in formal learning. And because learning is a continuum, we sometimes reflect on something that we learned years ago. There is a long tail of learning experience.  In addition to reflection, we often need to design application/practice opportunities for those learners.


On the call were Clark Quinn, Patti Poe, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Syder, Mickey Coalwell, Jill Hurst-Wahl and Maurice Coleman. You can listen to the call here.

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