Two arrows formed into a circleOn the call were Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman. With Maurice back, the audio was guaranteed to go well!  The conversation began with the Disciplined Pursuit of Less.  Then they talked about some questions related to helping others realize that they need to keep on learning, how to sneak it in, and how to keep our selves motivated to continue to improve ourselves.

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It seems that when Maurice Coleman doesn’t host, things go badly.  There might be a very short recording, but don’t listen to it!  We couldn’t get audio to work for everyone.  Heavy sigh.  And on a day when we were supposed to be talking about making time for our own learning, we admitted that we had other things to do.  As Paul wrote:

Funny to be talking about the busy gene on a day when we were supposed to be talking about slowing things down.

So the next T is for Training will be April 12, 2 p.m. ET. We will use the video “The Disciplined Pursuit of Less” (9 min.) as fodder for our conversation.  As I (Jill) noted in email, this video hit home for several reasons. First, I am tired of saying that I’m “busy”. Second, I know that seemingly being involved in everything is impacting my ability to learn new things (some of which I really should learn). So I would like to propose three questions: (1) How do we prioritize our own learning? (2) How can we help the learners around us make continued learning a priority? (3) What strategies do we have for ‘sneaking in’ learning?

Maurice and Paul look forward to whomever can join the conversation on April 12!  Thanks to  Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Andrea Snyder, and Diane Huckabay for showing up today.

Education and the Workforce of the FuturePaul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman talked about the ShapingEDU 2019 Unconference.  What would learning and the workplace look like in 20 years?  What do current employers need from learners in order to prove what they know?  Are people willing to do life-long learning?

We touched on Jill’s recent blog post, Libraries have a People Problem, which is related to today’s topic.

The bottom line of today’s discussion is, learning is experience and experience is learning.

On the call were Diane Hackabay, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman. Paul had proposed that the crew explore explore the changing nature of our onsite-online (blended) learning spaces today–and the tech tools that support/encourage the changing nature of those blended spaces.  But where did the conversation meander? Paul provided this blog post to kick off the conversation.

Dictionary entry for learning by Nick Youngson, CC BY-SA 3.0On the show today were Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman, who discussed a recent article by Terry Heick for TeachThought, entitled “44 Alternatives to ‘What’d You Learn in School Today?‘”

Among the items discussed were:

  • What sort of things we do to follow-up with unsatisfied learners.
  • Ways we ask questions that engage learners as co-conspirators in the learning process.
  • Difficult questions we can ask at the end of a session to gauge where we were successful and where we could have been better as learning facilitators.
  • Questions we can ask that inspire learners to apply what they have learned during the time they spend with us.

You can listen to the entire episode on TalkShoe.  Our next show will be on March 1, 2 p.m. ET. All are welcome to join in.  Details for doing do are on the T is for Training website.

effective-learning-feedbackThis week we circled back to the article, 20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning. We began by talking about #4, which gives us these for questions to ask:

  • What can the student do?
  • What can’t the student do?
  • How does the student’s work compare with that of others?
  • How can the student do better?

Then moved into ways of providing feedback and the role of feedback.  Near the end, we talked about focusing on the person receiving the feedback and what impact we want it to have.

On the call this week were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.

Resources:

Rogers, Jenica. (2019) Define a “Natural.”

Reynolds, Laura. (2018) 20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning. 

 

effective-learning-feedback

[Regular Host Note:  So, there are two shows recorded, and Talkshoe in its infinite wisdom saved them both.  If you click the arrow in the Talkshoe player on the site, you can play the second “experimental” episode.  I think it is an auditory house of horrors. YMMV.  Jill, Paul and Diane deserve full medals of heroism for even trying to keep up with the multiple technical glitches that happened.]   

WELL!

We recorded a show, or so we thought.  What you will hear is a 38 second clip38 second clip from Paul Signorelli, who thought he was able to restart the recording. But NO!  (Oh, TalkShoe, your new platform needs improvements.)

And the fact that you can’t hear our conversation is a good thing.  The sound was horrible with both an echo and what sounded like “wind”.  (Thank you, TalkShoe.)

In the portion that you cannot year,  Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli discussed the article:

Laura Reynolds, “20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning,” TeachThought, 12/6/2018.

We talked primarily about giving feedback to learners. We acknowledged that when feedback is connected with a grade or a performance review, the learner may push back on it.  Diane gave the suggestion of peer feedback, and we had begun talking about how to teach learners to give feedback, when we decided that the sound was too horrid to continue.

As Paul said later, it was the best episode you will never hear!

We plan on coming back to this topic, and article, in two weeks.  We hope you’ll join us then!

 

 

New Year goals 2019On the first show of 2019 were Aaron Blumberg, Maurice Coleman, and Paul Signorelli. The show occasionally attracts a distruptor, whose behavior got the person kicked off the call.  New people are always welcome, but people who just want to be disruptive are not.

Today’s topic grow out of an article written by Paloma Cantero-Gomez, in Forbes, entitled Make Use of These Top 7 tips to Achieve Your Goals in 2019.”  We focus heavily on goals at the start of the new calendar year, but what we need to do to achieve our goals are activities which occur every day.  Those activities include, for example, deciding at the end of a training session what we need to do next.

Additional Resources:

Photo of Jay DolmageJay Dolmage, associate professor at the University of Waterloo (Canada) is a committed to disability rights.  His writings on the topic include the book Disability Rhetoric  (2014), Academic Ableism: Disability and Higher Education (2017), and Disabled Upon Arrival: Eugenics, Immigration, and the Construction of Race and Disability (2018).  He is the Founding Editor of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies. In 2015, he published online a “long list of UD suggestions, organized according to some of the different modes of ‘delivery’ or styles of teaching in higher education.”  The list – “Universal Design: Places to Start” – in a 23-page appendix (PDF) in Disability Studies Quarterly.

On T is for Training, we have frequently discussed elements of universal design, without using that phrase.  Some of the suggestions are things we’ve discussed, while some are not.  With an increased focus on accessibility, this list is definitely worth using.

Slide with textOn the call were Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Aaron Blumberg, and Maurice Coleman. We talked about the “Top 10 Learning And Development Trends For 2018.” Written in March, we decided to to reflect on whether we had experienced any of the trends this year.  The trends are:

  1. Personalization
  2. Bite-Sized Support Resources
  3. Robust Reports And Analytics
  4. Self-Paced Online Training
  5. Gamification
  6. Collaborative Online Learning Cultures
  7. Responsive Design
  8. Virtual And Augmented Reality
  9. Online Mentorship Programs
  10. Social Learning Experiences

Is there an 11th trend? Paul, proposed understanding that training/learning is both a process and an event.

We touched on all of the trends above and brought in examples from our training and work lives.  Listen to the call on the TalkShoe web site.

Our next T will be on Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 at 2 p.m. ET.

Happy New Year!

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