Artwork

Tonight’s T is for Training was a conversation between Tom Haymes, Maurice Coleman, and Jill Hurst-Wahl on learning trends that are occurring after the COVID-19 pandemic.  As background, Ken Blanchard Companies blog post, Learning and Development Trends for 2021, says:

Face-to-face training was hit especially hard in 2020 and is certainly on the minds of L&D professionals looking into next year. While most respondents expect to have classroom training available again sometime in 2021, they are preparing for a big shift in how it is used, says [Jay Campbell, Ken Blanchard Companies’ senior vice president of products and content].

“Face-to-face workshops have always been the dominant modality in the L&D space. Our survey results show that pre-COVID, respondents estimated 63% of their delivery was in-person instructor-led training (ILT). During the past ten months, that percentage has plunged to 9%. The hero here is virtual instructor-led training (VILT), which grew from 10% to 53%, and self-paced digital, which rose from 14% to 24%.

“COVID-19 created a discontinuity in the normal evolutionary path toward digital and virtual. It has accelerated the shift—possibly by as much as a decade!

“Face-to-face training still has its place, but it will be a modality that L&D people will use selectively. It’s no longer the default. According to our results, 56% of respondents say the physical classroom still has a role, but mainly as a part of a blended learning experience. Most survey participants expect that blend to be about one-third ILT, one-third VILT, and one-third a combination of self-paced learning, coaching, and mentoring.

Also as background, Tom Haymes wrote The Four Stages of Zoom Enlightenment. In that piece, he talks about:

Stage I – Presentation (Substitution)
Stage II – Distributed Conversations (Augmentation)
Stage III – Workshopping (Augmentation)
Stage IV – Digital Constructivism (Redefinition)

Tom also wrote The System-Tool Paradox – Part I – The Perils of Letting Systems and Tools Dictate Practice, which is another resource on this topic.

We talked about virtual and in-person conferences and courses, what worked, and what our hopes are for the new normal (and not the old new normal).  You can listen to the entire episode on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcasts.

41oaWeZR-8L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_ Sardek Love joined Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Tom Haymes,  and Maurice Coleman on the show. Sardek is the co-author of Speak for a Living, and describes himself as a performance consultant.  On LinkedIn, he releases advice every week (free video) through LinkedIn and the website AskAMasterFacilitator. We talked about virtual training, what happens when training is bloated with useless information, adult learning theory, the power of 3-5 steps, learning through failure, making content accessible, and much more…including a few laughs.

A book recommended during the podcast was Thing Explainer: Complicated Stuff in Simple Words.

You can listen to the show on the TalkShoe website and through your favorite podcast provider.

On the call were Alexandra (Alex) Almestica, Tom Haymes, Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Diane Huckabay, and Jill Hurst-Wahl. We began with Jill giving an overview of why she wrote five blog posts (below) on diversifying library staff. We then launched into a lively and informative conversation about diversity in the profession. We provided stories from our own lived experiences as we talked about this complex problem. We recognized the lack of data that could help us understand aspects of the problem, and why that data doesn’t exist.  In the end, we acknowledged that this is a problem that some just don’t understand. And if don’t understand it, you can’t address it.

You can listen to the show on Talkshoe and through your favorite podcast service. Our next show will be on March 25, 9 p.m. ET on Talkshoe.

The T is for Training Gang

Resources

Zoom advertisementAndrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Tom Haymes, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman talked about technology and the upcoming new normal in regards to teaching-training-learning in 2021.  Tech-wise, we discussed a few technologies with a in-depth discussion of broadband access and the lack of digital infrastructure. As we pivoted to talk about things trainers might find useful, we spent a few minutes on good lighting.  Tom mentioned how to improve your lighting on the cheap, while Jill mentioned her new inexpensive ring light. In terms of what the new normal might be…Holey moley! Did we agree? Nope!

You can listen to the show on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcasts.

Resources:

Mesh-networked Arduino Leonardo (from the Data Sensing Lab)Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Maurice Coleman, and Paul Signorelli used the article What is the Future of Librarians in Times of Pandemic?” as the jumping-off point for a conversation on skills we need to foster among our library peers. From the article:

…librarians must exercise critical thinking, data analysis, flexibility, leadership, and technology management. These are instrumental in creating a digital infrastructure that allows library services to remain in place during isolation. To publicize these services and keep connected with the community, librarians must have a working familiarity with the advanced communication and promotion methodologies used in marketing.
We talked about the need for data, learning how to be an administrator, how to fix the building, and more. Yes, we talked about what we think should be taught in library science programs.  Listen to the show on Talkshoe or wherever you listen to podcasts.

four people holding booksOn the call were Tom Haymes, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Maurice Coleman, and Paul Signorelli. We  spent this episode talking about the book Change the World Using Social MediaThis was a lively conversation, which included:

  • The need for trust (BTW the original title of the show was “Moving at the pace of trust”)
  • How is social media being used for activism
  • Are communities and connections for short or long-term
  • Examples of activism on social media
  • Connecting with people on social tools versus face-to-face
  • Tool features
  • Bounded versus unbounded communities

This was SO lively that we continued on after the recording stopped.  Only hunger got us to sign off!

Our next T is for Training will be on Feb. 11 at 9 p.m. ET.  Please join us!

Slides from Tom HaymesOn the call were Tom Haymes, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, and Maurice Coleman to talk about the ShapingEDU Winter Games. All sessions from this three-day event were recorded and archived on YouTube. We had a lively conversation and you’ll have to listen to the show for the tidbits.

Resources:

The T is for Training crewOn our traditional year-end wrap show, Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Paul Diane Hackabay talked about:

  • The need for high speed internet access is
  • The need for good technology in front of you for the training that you’re taking
  • Online virtual conferences
  • When should you do online versus in-person training/conferences
  • What is important and what isn’t came into focus
  • Building virtual communities
  • The home working space, glimpses into people’s lives, and what interrupts the meeting
  • What online learning and what it means to us
  • Breakout rooms in online learning (Paul referenced the work of Sardek Love.)
  • The need for good institutional support
  • Managing expectations

This was definitely a lively show. Yes, a good look back at the year, along with some laughter and tears. The next show would be on New Year’s Eve (a.k.a., T is for Training: The Home Alone/Together Again Episode on New Year’s Eve), but instead will be on January 14, 2021. We look forward to see you then!

 

Book coverMaurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli and Tom Haymes talked about Tom’s upcoming book Learn at Your Own Risk: 9 Strategies for Teaching in a Pandemic and Beyond, which will be published very soon.  The book details how to design a human-centric future of learning emerges from pandemic teaching experience. According to the books’s press release:

Learning is a process of conversation, between the teacher and students, among the students, and, most importantly, within the minds of the students themselves. We have lost sight of this as teaching technology, starting with the blackboard in the mid-19th Century, emphasized the broadcast of learning rather its facilitation. Remote teaching has exposed the cracks in this approach. From the book, “To make something digital is to make transparent all of its flaws. What we are seeing right now is the lifting of the veil that has obscured the vast majority of teaching that occurs in our classrooms on a daily basis.” We can do better. We owe it to our students.
 
Learn at Your Own Risk represents a set of 9 strategies designed to help teachers rethink how they reach their students; using technology to bring the student to learning rather than using it to fling learning to the digital winds. The book starts with the central premise that there is no substitute for the human connections at the center of learning. Technology can augment but never replace those connections. Digital technology also gives us opportunities to manipulate time and space in ways that were impossible when we relied exclusively on the physical world to communicate with our students.

The book is both strategy and practical advice. Besides the quick guides, there is also a deeper dive into the strategies.

Due the podcast, Tom made the point that we have been humans conforming to technology, rather that conforming technology to humans.  Technology allows us to build education that starts and ends with the learner.

After talking about education, we turned our attention to conference, and then thinking about what is occurring in other countries.

You can listen to the full episode on TalkShoe or through your favorite podcast platform.

FYI… Paul Signorelli’s book is coming out soon (Dec. 15) Change the World using Social Media. Jill Hurst-Wahl is giving an eCourse on copyright starting on Feb. 1.   Details about U.S. Copyright Law in the Library: A Beginner’s Guide eCourse are on the ALA website.

Accessibility word cloudOn the show were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Tom Haymes, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman. Spurred by some recent activities on making presentations more accessible, accessibility was the topic for this episode. We talked about some tools and methods, as well as why accessibility matters. As Tom noted, accessibility is a way to reach more people.

We talked about:

  • Closed captioning
  • Eliminating complexity in your content
  • Reacting to the look of confusion in your audience and reacting to it
  • Having accessible language
  • Reading the chat out loud for those who are blind or visually impaired
  • Describe what is on the screen when you have people who need to hear the visual clues
  • Alt-text for images and graphics
  • Checking the reading order of text
  • Re-arranging your class session to accommodate people who need material to be more accessible

Resources:

Our next show will record on Dec. 3 at 9 p.m. ET.  You’re welcome to join us!

Next Page »