brussell sproutsThe groups talked about how do you pave the way for training to be well received? How to create effective resources for an unknown user group? They also talked about ALA and our dream cities for possible locations. One the call were Kate Kosturski, Andrea Snyder, and Maurice Coleman.

You can listen to the episode here.

 

A lock with a warning on itThis week, we welcomed Dr. Steve Albrecht, who wrote the book Library Security: Better Communication, Safer Facilities.  Steve is a member of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals and is an ATAP Certified Threat Manager.   He’s on Twitter at @DrSteveAlbrecht.   Also on the call were Maurice Coleman (@baldgeekinmd), Paul Signorelli (@paulsignorelli), Andrea Snyder @alsynder02), Laura Fothergill (@laurafothergill), and Jill Hurst-Wahl (@jill_hw). The show can be heard here.

Why did Steve write this book?  A group knew that he wrote about workplace violence and asked that he think about this topic from a library perspective.  He has done workshops and webinars on the topic.  After a umber of years, he wrote a book on the topic.

What are the three keys to a safer library?

  • An assertive use of the library’s code of conduct.  He believes the code of conduct should be posted and visible.  The language should help people understand what they can do.
  • Create partnership relationships with people in the larger community who can help the library address specific issues (e.g., homelessness).
  • Talk with staff about issues and do training, and group problem solving.  Have an incident reporting system.

Do many libraries have an incident reporting system?  Many do.  the incident report needs to be in a format – and in enough details – to be useful for people inside and outside of the library (e.g., law enforcement).  The law of documentation may stop you from getting the help you need in handling a specific situation.

Is it true that the more urban your library, the more likely you’ll have security concerns?  It doesn’t matter where the facility is. What matters is that the culture has demonstrated what the library will tolerate.  A culture that is inviting and supportive, where people self-police, is best.

Steve noted that people often don’t talk about what has driven them away from the library.  If someone’s behavior has stopped people from coming to the library, you need to know that.

What is your experience with libraries in terms of reaching out to teens?   The library needs to be best people talking to the teens.  “Best” means the person who is aligned with the teens.  It might be someone their age or someone who has a connection with the teens.

Steve cautions to be aware of peer pressure.  Rather than talking to kids as a group, talk to them individually.  Perhaps talk to one, who can take the message back to the other teens.  Also one on one, you might really hear what the problem or situation is.

Steve noted that a security guard’s job is customer service.

What advice does Steve have for helping us work with staff who have challenging patrons?  We know that we have patrons who have idiosyncratic behavior.  How does that person’s behavior impact the business?  The fact that a person is homeless is not the issue; the person’s behavior might be an issue.

What are some key staff do’s or don’ts when dealing with security (challenging patrons)?

  • Have a consistent message.  For example, enforce the code of conduct consistently throughout the week and year.
  • Understand the idea of space and distance.  Give people space and distance.  Be aware of violating someone’s space.  Space can also provide safety.

Does this relate to cultural competency or diversity training?  Steve relates this to the three C’s: consistency, community, and communication.  He noted that diversity training can be a loaded top and so trainers need to be purposeful in how they approach the topic.

Lecturing versus experiential learning?  Steve likes doing both.

In terms of a code of conduct, should it be more do’s or don’ts?  Steve believes it should be more do’s.  If written legalistically, it becomes don’ts.  Turn the language around so it is engaging and is not lecturing.  It should be friendly and short.  People should be able to say what the code is and how it is enforced.

What should be considered a threat?  Maurice noted that some staff members don’t know what a threat is.  There is research into who makes threats versus who carries out threats.  There are people who are howler, who make a lot of noise and who are verbally provocative.  Then there are hunters, who are rare, who will do the the most damage.  We run into howlers much more frequently than hunters.  A concern are those people who tell a third party and make an indirect threat.  He is more concerned about indirect threats versus direct threat.  However, Steve noted that being aware of all threats – direct or indirect – is important and assessing them.

When a howler is confronted and expresses remorse, that is a good thing.  A howler who is not remorseful could be problematic.

Should sites have their facilities assessed for security?  Yes.  Use a checklist or have the police do a walk through. You do not necessarily need to hire a security consultant.

Steve believes in a delineated barrier between the staff and patron side of the building.

How do you confront someone?  Do it in pairs, so that you have someone to support you and to be a witness.

Steve Albrecht said much more than what is captured here.  You can here the entire show on Talkshoe.

Sunset view from Clinton SquareMaurice Coleman and Paul Signorelli celebrated the life of a friend in spirit of the show, talked about how to deal with the tragically unexpected thing before or during a training, and how does an introvert train, and are bullet points on slides a feature or a bug. You can listen to the show here.

Lake Eola Classic ViewJules Shore, Maurice Coleman and Paul Signorelli talked about the ALA Annual Conference in Orlando, our favorite things and takeaways about the conference.  You can listen to the show here.

Inspiration or distraction?

Inspiration or Distraction?

This week’s topic was inspired by the blog post “Attention, distraction, deep work and burnout” by Jill.  On the call were Buffy Hamilton, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Laura Fothergill and Maurice Coleman.

Buffy noted that some K-12 school districts do allow students to bring their own devices into the classroom.  However, she did notice some students this past year who became very engrossed in their mobile devices during lunch and never did anything else during lunchtime.

One other distraction is when people monopolize the conversation.  See “What teens resent: Classrooms controlled by students rather than teachers“.

Paul pointed to his post Social Media Feast and Fast: Disconnecting for a Day.

We talked about distraction in library training, K-12, and higher education.  Paul and Laura provided tools that people can use for digital note-taking which include Twitter, Prezi,  OneNote, and Sway…and a myriad of other things.

The show – which contains much more than what’s in these notes – can be listened to here.  The unedited chat – or as we say…the back channel – from the show is here.  Paul felt that others might want to read the chat, which was very focused this week.

Additional Resources:

Revolutionize Learning & Development. (2014). San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons and ASTD Press

Clark Quinn 

Quinn--Revolutionize_L&D--CoverClark Quinn is certainly not the first to say he is mad as hell and to urge us to not take it anymore. But in this well-researched, highly- and finely-nuanced book, he does far more than recycle old rants. He builds upon research-based evidence to show where we continue to go wrong in talent development and, more importantly, offers suggestions for changing our course(s) to the benefit of those we serve. The real winners here are the learners we will better support by adapting Quinn’s first-rate recommendations to fit our learners’ and organizations’ needs.

–This brief review, originally written as a “shelf talker” posted in the conference bookstore at the ATD 2016 International Conference & Exposition in Denver (May 2016), is re-posted here with the permission of our ATD colleagues. A longer set of reflections is available on the “Building Creative Bridges” blog.

 

ASTD Handbook: The Definitive Reference for Training & Development. (2014). Alexandria: ASTD Press

Elaine Biech, editor 

ASTD_Handbook--CoverIf the title doesn’t already say all it all, let’s go one step further: Elaine Biech is one of our great ATD (Association for Talent Development) resources, and the Handbook is a treasured, foundational part of my talent-development book collection. Well organized and comprehensive in its survey of all aspects of talent development, the book makes nearly 100 of our greatest colleagues/mentors accessible to us within one volume. Whether you use it as an encyclopedia (exploring topics on an as-needed basis) or decide to read it cover-to-cover (and there’s no reason why you can’t do both), it’s a cherished must-have book.

–This brief review, originally written as a “shelf talker” posted in the conference bookstore at the ATD 2016 International Conference & Exposition in Denver (May 2016), is re-posted here with the permission of our ATD colleagues. 

The Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning: How to Turn Training and Development into Business Results (3rd edition). (2015). Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons and ATD Press

Roy V.H. Pollock, Andrew McK. Jefferson, and Calhoun Wick 

9781118647998_front.pdfWhen you sit down to read The Six Disciplines, you’ll want to have a highlighter nearby: every page of this book bursts with wonderful guidance and stories that remind us talent development [aka training-teaching-learning-doing], at its best, is a results-driven endeavor. Having been tremendously influenced by the first edition when the Six Disciplines phenomenon was initially gaining steam, I found myself falling in love with the book all over again in its latest iteration; it’s like meeting an old friend who had a first-rate makeover none of us realized was necessary. Glad the authors continue to build on their earlier successes.

–This brief review, originally written as a “shelf talker” posted in the conference bookstore at the ATD 2016 International Conference & Exposition in Denver (May 2016), is re-posted here with the permission of our ATD colleagues. 

Outside the Denver Art Museum

Outside the Denver Art Museum

On the call were Andrea Snyder, Kate Kosturski, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman. The topic for today was “The Size of the Room.”  How do we extend and expand a conference conversation easily, quickly and at a low cost (or free).

  • Using social media, one easy why is to create a unique hashtag and use that hashtag for a Twitter chat after the event is over.
  • Do post-conference recap sessions for librarians in your area (geographic or topic).  This could be done face-to-face or online (virtual).
  • Do pecha kuchas for staff.  One group creates a slidedeck with slides from different sessions that people want to to discuss.
  • Rather than being at a distance and saying that you’re not there, consider asking how people at the event want you to interact with them in the moment.

Paul reminded us that it is a room with an open door, which means you can enter or not, and enter when you want to.

Paul’s takeaway from the Association for Talent Development (ATD) Annual Conference is to end conversations with action plans, so that things occur. This moves people to be doers.  This is actually something Paul has had us do on T is for Training.

Paul mentioned the closing keynote by Jeremy Gutsche.  A version of his talk is in Youtube:

Andrea’s takeaway from the Public Library Association (PLA) Conference, included these topics:

  • Cultural awareness and inclusivity as topics of sessions
  • Empathy
  • Libraries as creation spaces, which is not just technology
  • The fact that everyone has biases

PLA organized a handout and post-conference conversations through Facebook so help people extend the learning.

Andrea mentioned this talk from Verna Myers, who was the “Big Ideas” keynote speaker:

Recaps of the conference are at http://rcplpla2016.blogspot.com/.

BTW we invested a new term, which is “pottycast.”  You’ll have to listen to the show to understand why or how.

You can listen to the show here.

Fort Worth Public Library -Central- ADA accomodations (3)On the call were Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl and Diane Huckaby.  We talked about making accommodations to address the needs of all learners.  You can listen to the show here (31 minutes).

Resources:

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