70 degreesThis was a rich conversation and the notes don’t do it justice. The topic was selected by Paul Signorelli based on this quote from Clark Quinn:

it’s not about content, it’s about experience. Are you designing experiences?

In our training sessions, how do we create experience? Do we provide the opportunity and space for people to transform?

If the learning environment isn’t what you want, rearrange the room. Ask learners – before the sessions ends – what needs to change in the environment and try to change it.  Quinn, who joined us on the call, noted that most evaluation forms do not really evaluate the impact of the training. Rather people evaluate the experience in terms of hot, cold, food, lighting, etc.

Who does experience correctly? We had multiple mentions of Disney. When we stop paying attention to the man behind the curtain (a reference to The Wizard of Oz), we’re truly involved in the experience.

We need to separate practitioners versus novices, so that the training/experience is appropriate. We need to consider how to scaffold the experience/learning.

Sometimes conferences are a place of reflection for people actively engaged, while in formal learning. And because learning is a continuum, we sometimes reflect on something that we learned years ago. There is a long tail of learning experience.  In addition to reflection, we often need to design application/practice opportunities for those learners.

Resources:

On the call were Clark Quinn, Patti Poe, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Syder, Mickey Coalwell, Jill Hurst-Wahl and Maurice Coleman. You can listen to the call here.

CoffeeAs a follow-up to T is for Training #163, the group discussed this handout from the Harwood Institute on sustaining yourself. Our conversation included examples from the recent ALA Annual Conference.

We want to note that Heather Plett has written a follow-up to the posts on “holding space”, which is “On holding space when there is an imbalance in power or privilege.”

There was a mention of a podcast interview with Daniel Levitin, https://soundcloud.com/inquiringminds/55-daniel-levitin-the-organized-mind, on how the brain works.  Begin at minute 25.

Also we referred to the book The Pursuit of Silence. There is an NPR interview (13 minutes) with its author at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125511963.

We ended the podcast by talking about how we are going to incorporate silence into our days: sitting in the backyard, weeding in the garden, zoning out on the commute home, taking breaks during work.

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Kate Kostuski, Jill Hurst-Wahl and Paul Signorelli. The episode can be heard here.

With the ALA Annual Conference in a few weeks, the crew talked about their favorite conference attendance tips and tricks.  You can here the whole episode T is for Training.  On the call were Kate Kosturski (who hosted this episode), Andrea Snyder, Jules Shore and a drop-in visitor.

On the call were Stephanie Zimmerman, Mickey Coalwell, Michael Porter, Andrea Snyder,  Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Patti Poe, Maurice Coleman, and [for a short time] Jeremiah.  We began by discussing this article:

Plett, Heather (@heatherplett). What it means to “hold space” for people, plus eight tips on how to do it well.  March 11, 2015.

We also noted that Plett has written a follow-up article entitled,”How to hold space for yourself first,” which we encourage that people read.

Green space inside Slocum HallThe group talked about almost all of the eight tips and found relevance in all of them for both learners and trainers.  Patti noted that the tips describe a good work environment and good bosses.  It is also a good guide for mentoring, and a great reading for people, who work the reference desk.

Those of us, who were on the call, want to thank Heather Plett for these two articles.  She sparked a wonderful conversation among us!

A book mentioned during the show was Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.  There was also a quick reference to Six Thinking Hats.

You can listen to the show here.

On the call were Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman, who discussed how to ensure your training causes the change it was designed to do and what it means to be a 21st century learner. The conversation emerged from the article:

Conrad Gottfredson, Conrad and Bob Mosher. “Are You Meeting All Five Moments of Learning Need?” Learning Solutions Magazine, June 18, 2012.  http://www.learningsolutionsmag.com/articles/949/

Because Paul seems to read everything and remember what he read, he mentions several resources/books during the show.

You can listen to the show here.

On the call were Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, Kate Kosturski, Andrea Snyder and Diane Hucklebee.  Two of the topics this week were inspiring continued change, doing what’s uncomfortable, and managing disruptive students/people.

You can listen to the show here.

On this T is for Training, Stephanie Zimmerman started us off with a conversation on ILEAD USA: Innovative Librarians Explore, Apply and Discover, which she participated in.  iLEAD USA is being used in 10 U.S. states. The videos from the keynotes and invited speakers from this event are at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLX5frlby3mLroZdaOO4CFJVV6P-N6XlM2.  Information on the iLEAD Pennsylvania teams is at https://ileadusapennsylvania.wordpress.com/.  Stephanie noted that there was a heavy use of Twitter during the live event.  The iLEAD Twitter name is @ILEAD_USA and they used the hashtag of #ileadusa.

Stephanie’s iLEAD presentation and handouts are at:

Stephanie mentioned this book Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, which Eli Neiburger mentioned in his presentation.  The Project Gutenberg version is at http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/201.

The near-final topic was on how to make conference more appropriate for long-term participants. (Dear Conference Organizers, yes, this is an issue.  How can we help?)

In a tangent, the crew talked about how public libraries are chartered in New York and Maryland.  For NYS info, go to http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/libs/pltypes.htm.

On the call were Angela Paterek (@trainingpassion), Stephanie Zimmerman (@slzimm1) , Andrea Snyder (@alsnyder02), Jill Hurst-Wahl (@jill_hw) and Maurice Coleman (@baldgeekinMD). You can listen to the show here.

Green SpongeLibraries are all about lifelong learning.  How do we support/push/encourage people towards learning about things that they don’t know (and perhaps even don’t know what they don’t know)? How do we get people to become sponges soaking up information and skills, rather than mugs waiting to be filled with knowledge? We recognize that we need to make it safe for people to ask about the things that they don’t know, and make it safe to try something and fail.

The crew talked about many aspects of this, including:

  • When people have a “moment of need”, can they figure out how to learn the important information?
  • Do people fear failure or fear success?
  • How do you meet people “where they are” (in what they need to know)?

At the end of the show, we talked about weeding your responsibilities and finding joy in your work.

On the call were Andrea Snyder, Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli and Jill Hurst-Wahl. You can listen to the episode here.

 

Today’s topic was careers of teaching/training in librarianship. How does someone get started as a Staff Development or Trainer, whether directly after library school or as a mid-career move.  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Kate Kosturski, Patti Poe, Laura Botts, and Paul Signorelli.

A resource mentioned was “Inspiring Leadership through Emotional Intelligence.”

The show can be listened to here.

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  We began with this quote:

One challenge with learning—and where most get stuck—is the emotional challenge that results from being confronted with not knowing. Being wrong is typically more comfortable than uncertainty, which is why we have to learn to let go. In whitewater kayaking that may mean literally dropping into something scary in an entirely new way—and remaining open to that experience. With the proper mindset, curiosity is more powerful and certainly more useful than fear. – From “Winning When It Counts“, Spirituality & Health

Topics included:

  • Emotional challenge and learnng
  • Learning those auxiliary lessons and not just the topic being taught
  • Failure and learning
  • Teaching through failure
  • And random other topics like the John Green video “Places I’ve Never Been.”

You can listen to the episode here.

Addendum: Andrea found this after we were done recording: A Quick Note On Getting Better At Difficult Things

Next Page »



Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 28 other followers