King TutOn the call today were Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl and Maurice Coleman.  We did a thought experiment of talking about what the future of our work as trainers-teachers might look like.  This discussion was loosely based on the “in 2035” idea/graphic on Jonathan Nadler’s web site. Questions, which we thought we might consider, were:
  • What will training/teaching look like in 5, 10 or 17 years? (2023, 2028, 2035)  Why?
  • What do trainers – people like us – need to do now to prepare for that new reality?
  • What’s the best cause scenario? Worst case?
However, we spent our time mostly on the first one.
We started by thinking what has changed in the last 17 years?  For example:
  • How people and groups take notes
  • Democratization and sharing of information
  • The language we use, including our use of pronouns

What came up when we thought forward 17 years?

  • How do we scale what we do now? (e.g., note-taking and interacting)
  • How will storytelling – which is a part of training – change?
  • How will people be trained on those assumed skills (e.g., word processing)?
  • Will people be willing to be trained on needed basic skills (which the likely could fake)?
  • Will people maintain their curiosity?
  • And more…

Resources

You can listen to the show online at TalkShoe or through iTunes.  Please skip ahead to the 7:45 mark where the show actually begins.  (A feature of the new TalkShoe is that it begins recording once people have called in, rather than allowing the host to start the recording.)

TalkShoe’s Major Overhaul

TalkShoe has gone through a major overhaul.  When you join us “on the call”, know that you’ll have a bit of a learning curve (and you heard us go through it on the last episode).  The phone number is now 1-605-562-0444, HOWEVER, you can also just use your computer audio, which you may prefer.
The platform now provides a way for us to see each other (video), although that video feed is not capture. The platform does capture the chat text, so we will need to be careful of how we use it as a back channel.  In fact, we may look for another back channel method, since having one has been useful.

10 Years Strong

T is for Training is coming up on its 10th anniversary (around Sept. 13)!  If you haven’t called in recently, please consider popping in on one of these episodes, as we celebrate T’s longevity.  And if you have the email address of anyone else who used to call in, please invite them to join in, too.  Of course, newcomers are ALWAYS welcome!
Advertisements

Clark Quinn

Clark_Quinn--Millennials_Goldfish_Training_Misconceptions--book_coverThe training myths, misconceptions, and superstitions to which we subscribe are hurting us, the organizations we serve, and those served by our learners, Clark Quinn maintains throughout his wonderfully engaging new book, Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions.

Quinn’s respect for and commitment to evidence-based research, his puckish sense of humor, and his obvious commitment to setting and fostering the highest possible standards of professionalism in learning and development are on clear display throughout the book–as they were during his T is for Training conversation in Episode #230.

Highly recommended.

–A longer review of the book is available on the ATD (Association for Talent Development) Science of Learning blog.

Little Dutch shoesOn the call were Jill Hurst-Wahl, Diane Huckabay, Laura Fothergill, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  We talked about the article “Use ‘Metaphorical Scaffolding’ to Learn the Hard Stuff,” by Charles Chu, from The Polymath Project site. We also spent time talking about how we have used metaphors in our training and then digressed into talking about the new TalkShoe interface.

A great quote from the article is:

High-level thinkers are not dark magicians — they’re smart-but-otherwise-ordinary people who’ve picked up some interesting tricks.

You can listen to the entire show on the TalkShoe platform (53 minutes).  One reason, by the way, to listen to the entire show is that you can hear a group of technical people learn and adapt to a new Internet platform on the fly.

Thinking About This Specific T is for Training (and the new TalkShoe interface)

Being forced into using new technology without training is like turning four year olds loose is a playpen.

Using new technology can be like falling asleep and waking up in a new place, and finding that everything you knew was gone and you only understood every third word of the language you heard.

Updated TalkShoe

TalkShoe, the service used to host and record the shows, has updated itself – and did this throw us for a loop!  Please take a moment and give our page a look.  Also notice that it now displays how many times T is for Training has been downloaded just from TalkShoe! Wow…you all love us!

Along with the change in look, the phone number to call into the show has changed.  It is now (605) 562-0444.  Our show ID has remained the same (24719).

And So a Reminder

You can now stream/download episodes of the show back to January 2015. To download an episode, you click on the episode, then look in the upper right corner for the three dots. From there you can either download the episode or link to the episode recording.

Episodes previous to that were lost in the great Talkshoe Server Fail of 2018.

Talkshoe has changed lots of things about the site, including:

The interface is completely refreshed.  You should take a look before you join us again.  (Direct link to the T is for Training page.)

To join the call, you have to select the proper show, then join online studio.  What the controls look like inside the new studio will be a learning experience for all of us.

There is a new number to call into the show  
605-562-0444
Same Call ID: 24719

You can now stream/download episodes of the show back to January 2015.   To download an episode, you click on the episode, then look in the upper right corner for the three dots.  From there you can either download the episode or link to the episode recording.

Episodes previous to that were lost in the great Talkshoe Server Fail of 2018.

If you were smart/forward thinking enough to download and save older shows, please let me know @baldgeekinmd on twitter or baldgeekinmd at gmail.

You have my undying gratitude if you have some vintage shows saved.

Follow the show @tisfortraining for more info.

Thanks.

Talkshoe has changed lots of things about the site, including:

The interface is completely refreshed.  You should take a look before you join us again.  (Direct link to the T is for Training page.)

There is a new number to call into the show  
605-562-0444
Same Call ID: 24719

You can now ONLY stream episodes of the show back to January 2015.   Episodes previous to that were lost in the great Talkshoe Server Fail of 2018.

I will be working on a way to get downloads of the episode up as soon after the show as possible.

Follow the show @tisfortraining for more info.

Thanks.

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Clark Quinn, and Paul Signorelli, for a discussion centered on Clark’s wonderfully stimulating new book (from ATD Press) Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions: Debunking Learning Myths and Superstitions.

Clark talked about the process of writing the book at the request of ATD Senior Community of Practice Manager Justin Brusino (and why Clark originally wanted to call the book Dr. Quinn’s Emporium of Learning Myths); described what he learned from researching and writing the book (including what we actually know about the attention span of goldfish); offered insights into a variety of the learning myths and superstitions he explored in an attempt to help us better serve those we assist through our training-teaching-learning-doing efforts; and kept us entertained and interested in applying what we are learning from his work.

The resources mentioned during the program were rich and varied, and have been documented in a separate post on this T is for Training site.

Group at ALAOn the post ALA and post Fourth of July call were Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli. Our topic was:

Conferences (first half of 2018): What Are We Hearing, What Are the Trends We’re Seeing, and What Does All of That Mean for Those We Serve Through Training-Teaching-Learning-Doing?

Okay…so that is where we started, but we quickly wandered:

  • Social awareness issues
  • Responding to bullying, etc.
  • ALA panel on podcasting (So You Want to Podcast…)
  • The conference after the conference (a.k.a. networking at social events)
  • Micro-networking
  • Artificial intelligence

The panel from “So You Want to Podcast…” was (from the ALA web site):

  • Sara Benson, host of Copyright Chat, a podcast dedicated to discussing important copyright matters. She is a copyright librarian, attorney, and assistant professor at University of Illinois Library in Urbana-Champaign.
  • Maurice Coleman hosts the longest-running library training and presentation podcast T Is for Training. He is technical trainer at Harford County Public Library in Maryland. For 25 years he has facilitated live and virtual workshops and learning opportunities across the country. He was named a Library Journal Mover and Shaker in 2010.
  • Angela Ocana, co-host of the comic and manga fandom podcast One Panel Later, is a teen services supervisor with Eugene Library in Oregon. She is an American Library Association Emerging Leader, California Library Association Teen Librarian of the Year, and contributes to No Flying No Tights.
  • Steve Thomas is host and producer of the Circulating Ideas podcast, which facilitates conversations about the innovative people and ideas allowing libraries to thrive in the 21st century. He is a branch manager at Gwinnett County Public Library in metro Atlanta, where he does another podcast for the staff, Flip the Library.

Resources:

The show was 55 minutes. Be sure to give it a listen (and a review on your podcast-delivery site).

Statue of Sisyphus and a rockOn the call were Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli.  We discussed Google.

After you’ve listened to this show, set your calendar for our next show on July 6, after the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans.

 

 

 

 

Cat HerdersThis week we were joined by Christie Ward, who is one of Paul’s ATD (Association for Talent Development) colleagues.  Also on the call were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  Maurice interviewed Christie about her work, her association involvement, and her thoughts about delivering keynotes.  Christie did a wonderful job talking about the difference between delivering versus facilitating.  We ended the conversation talking about artificial intelligence (IA), augmented reality (AR), and the fourth industrial revolution.

In talking about how she collects information prior to delivering a workshop or speech for a client, some of the questions she uses are:

  • What is it in your workplace environment that is helping or hindering your performance?
  • What technology in your workplace helps or hinders your performance?

In her coaching work, she often asks:

  • What do you do when you lose track of time?  This is a great question to discover someone’s passions and to understand if those passions relate to a person’s work.

At the end, Maurice reminded us that each person wants to be seen as smart, important, and significant. As trainers-teachers-speakers, part of our work is to help our participants feel that.

The entire episode is available on TalkShoe.

Resources:

Yes, we talked for 70 minutes and ended hearing that the older episodes (pre-2015) are no longer on the TalkShoe platform.  They are, however, still available through Apple iTunes.  We’ll post more information on how to get to those older episodes.

Next Page »