Archive for March, 2019

It seems that when Maurice Coleman doesn’t host, things go badly.  There might be a very short recording, but don’t listen to it!  We couldn’t get audio to work for everyone.  Heavy sigh.  And on a day when we were supposed to be talking about making time for our own learning, we admitted that we had other things to do.  As Paul wrote:

Funny to be talking about the busy gene on a day when we were supposed to be talking about slowing things down.

So the next T is for Training will be April 12, 2 p.m. ET. We will use the video “The Disciplined Pursuit of Less” (9 min.) as fodder for our conversation.  As I (Jill) noted in email, this video hit home for several reasons. First, I am tired of saying that I’m “busy”. Second, I know that seemingly being involved in everything is impacting my ability to learn new things (some of which I really should learn). So I would like to propose three questions: (1) How do we prioritize our own learning? (2) How can we help the learners around us make continued learning a priority? (3) What strategies do we have for ‘sneaking in’ learning?

Maurice and Paul look forward to whomever can join the conversation on April 12!  Thanks to  Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Andrea Snyder, and Diane Huckabay for showing up today.

Education and the Workforce of the FuturePaul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman talked about the ShapingEDU 2019 Unconference.  What would learning and the workplace look like in 20 years?  What do current employers need from learners in order to prove what they know?  Are people willing to do life-long learning?

We touched on Jill’s recent blog post, Libraries have a People Problem, which is related to today’s topic.

The bottom line of today’s discussion is, learning is experience and experience is learning.

On the call were Diane Hackabay, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman. Paul had proposed that the crew explore explore the changing nature of our onsite-online (blended) learning spaces today–and the tech tools that support/encourage the changing nature of those blended spaces.  But where did the conversation meander? Paul provided this blog post to kick off the conversation.