Upcoming Episodes (Jan./Feb. 2022)

The next three episodes of T is for Training continue our practice of featuring an interesting mixture of guests and topics designed to inspire positive action among our colleagues in training-teaching-learning.

Howard Prager, a cherished colleague from ATD (the Association for Talent Development) will be with us this evening (Episode 303) to discuss his book Make Someone’s Day: Becoming a Memorable Leader in Work and Life and how it applies to our training-teaching-learning environments. Howard, as he notes on his own website, “is President of Advance Learning Group, an author, speaker, executive coach and leadership consultant who strengthens people and organizations through insightful talks, workshops, leadership and management programs.” Additional information about Howard and that engaging book is on my own website.

Maurice Coleman

We’ll be turning everything on its head here at T for Episode 304 (Thursday, February 10, 2022) when we put show host Maurice Coleman at the center of a conversation about trainer-teacher-learners as lifelong learners to celebrate Maurice’s achievement in having recently returned to school to earn a B.A.

Casey Davis, author of Digital Civics and Citizenship: An Applied Approach, joins us for Episode 305 (February 24, 2022) to discuss the themes in his book and how they apply to our own work in training environments across the U.S. Casey is an educator with more than 20 years of experience working with diverse learners in a variety of settings and is among the colleagues I’ve met through the ShapingEDU community, under the auspices of Arizona State University.

All three hour-long episodes will be recorded, as usual, at 9 pm ET/6 pm PT on the dates listed in this preview. Archived recordings will be posted here on the T is for Training blog.

–Paul Signorelli

@TisForTraining 300: Preview and Invitation to the Dance

As we look forward  (on December 2, 2021) to recording Episode #300—where have all those years gone?—of Maurice Coleman’s fabulous T is for Training podcast for trainer-teacher-learners working in and with libraries, I think, with gratitude, of all that Maurice and that community add to my life and to the lives of so many others.

Initiated in 2008 when Maurice decided—correctly, as it turns out—that a podcast might be an effective way to “replicate the vibe and comradery I felt at conferences where I was surrounded with brilliant members of my ‘tribe’ of trainers, computer folks and other gear/near/cool folk heads.”

T has always been more than a podcast. It’s a virtual meeting space…and I hope you’ll join us, via TalkShoe, for the recording of this episode Thursday, December 2, 2021 at 9 pm ET/6 pm PT: https://app.talkshoe.com/episode/16483204. Drop in to say “hello.” To tell a story about how T has has a positive impact on you and the learners you serve. Or to simply tell Maurice how lucky we are that he so consistently provides a forum for creative, transformative conversations for trainer-teacher-learners. (To see a longer version of this piece, please visit my Building Creative Bridges blog.)

–Paul Signorelli

September 2021 at T is for Training

Whether you’re a long-time supporter of T is for Training or new to the game/program, you’ll want to check out our episodes for September 2021.

Thursday, September 9, 2021, 9 pm ET/6 pm PT—Long-time T is for Training Usual Suspect Tom Haymes and our colleague Ruben Puentedura, Founder/President of Hippasus (hippasus.com) are joining us for a discussion about how we can help our learners map their learning experience according to their learning needs. The background, from Tom: Most students don’t get to map out their learning journeys. They choose a course of study, some courses within that course of study, but beyond that, the courses give them a normative set of skills. More than a decade ago, Wayne Brent of the University of Arizona mapped out a system (https://gameua.wordpress.com) for his graduate program in instructional design students that allowed them to accumulate points in the manner of a role-playing-game. This system gave them the agency to practice particular skills they wanted to sharpen. In this way, he allowed his students to map their learning experience according to their learning needs, not the predefined needs of the program or course. Hope you’ll join us for the discussion.

Thursday, September 23, 2021, 9 pm ET/6 pm PT—Rita Bailey, Sardek Love, and Paul Signorelli were among the trainer-teacher-learners traveling to Salt Lake City for the 2021 ATD (Association for Talent Development) International Conference & Exposition earlier this month to facilitate their first onsite learning sessions since the pandemic began. What they found was a dynamic, much-changed learning environment grounded in social-distancing practices that required a bit of pivoting to keep their sessions highly-interactive and engaging. Join us for this discussion of what trainer-teacher-learners need to know about facilitating onsite learning in the pandemic era.

–Posted by Paul Signorelli

Summer 2021 at T is for Training

Although there will be no recording of T is for Training this evening (brief holiday break to give Maurice Coleman, our Cat Herder in Chief a chance to spend time with family), there is quite a nice line-up for July/August 2021 on T is for Training:

Thursday, July 15, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–R. David Lankes, author of the newly-released Forged in War: How a Century of War Created Today’s Information Society, will join us for a discussion about what trainer-teacher-learners can learn from the book.

Jill Hurst-Wahl

Thursday, July 29, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–Our own Jill Hurst-Wahl, who will receive the Special Libraries Association’s John Cotton Dana lifetime-achievement recognition award in a public online ceremony August 3 and who has posted a set of reflections on her blog (“Personal Good News and Contributing to Your Profession”), will be with us for a conversation about volunteerism, professional development, and training-teaching-learning.

Thursday, August 12, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–Clark Quinn, who has been with us for some great conversations over the past few years, returns for a discussion about Learning Science for Instructional Designers: From Cognition to Application (released in April 2021).

James Richardson

Thursday, August 26, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–James Richardson, a Sacramento-based “writer, farmhand, Episcopal priest,” will join us for a conversation about getting from no to yes in training-teaching-learning. There is, of course, a backstory here: Jim and I worked together at The UCLA Daily Bruin a couple of lifetimes ago; we recently reconnected, and his story about how he moved from full-time work as a journalist to being a minister by learning to move “from no to yes” struck me as being a wonderful jumping off point for this episode of T is for Training. And yes, he continues to write: he has an amazing book (his second) coming out next year: “The Abolitionist’s Journal, due for release in fall 2022, is the story of his anti-slavery ancestor who used his house on the Underground Railroad, served as the white chaplain to a Black Union regiment in the Civil War, and then with his family founded a college for the freed slaves in Austin, Texas (Samuel Huston College).”

–Posted by Paul Signorelli

From the T is for Training Bookshelf: Innovate Inside the Box

Sometimes a book can be much more than what rests upon its pages. It can be a catalyst. A meeting place. An invitation to engage in reflective learning. And the center of a community that forms when each of us, through our own reactions and interactions with the book and other readers, end up producing our own individual, highly-personalized versions of that book—which is exactly the sort of multilevel, potentially transformative experience that George Couros and Katie Novak have produced through Innovate Inside the Box: Empowering Learners Through UDL [Universal Design for Learning] and the Innovator’s Mindset.

The book itself–discussed in Episode #261 of the podcast–is a paeon to the idea that innovation can be fostered as much by and within the limitations we face as trainer-teacher-learners as by thinking outside the box: “…the system, with its rules and limitations, is never a reason not to innovate. To the contrary, the system or ‘box’ you work within may be the very reason you need to innovate,” Couros writes in the opening pages of the introduction to the book. And, as has happened both times I have read books he has produced, I find myself taking an innovative approach to the act of reading itself: slowing down rather than racing through the text; stopping to follow links to sources (e.g., blog posts, short articles, or videos) he has cited in his text so that they become part of my personal version of the book; reflecting, through blog posts, on the content he (and, in this case, in collaboration with Novak) provides as a way of more deeply and rewardingly absorbing what he offers; and engaging in online interactions with others who are also reading—or have read—the book.

Section One of the book—“The Core of Innovative Teaching and Learning”—has Couros, as a co-conspirator in our learning process, walking us through chapters exploring the importance of relationships in learning; learning that is learner-drive and evidence-informed; creating (and engaging in) empowered learning experiences; and being both a master learner and a master educator—recognizing, at all times, that the word “master” does not mean that we are perfect.

The second section fully carries us into chapter-by-chapter explorations of the “characteristics of the Innovator’s Mindset”: empathetic, problem finders-solvers, risk-takers, networked, observant, creators, resilient, and reflective. A short, very sweet concluding section suggesting “You Are the Change You Seek” serves as a reminder that “finishing” the book does not mean we are about to place it on a shelf where it becomes covered under an ever-growing shroud of dust, for this is not the kind of book you finish—or that is ever finished with you. As long as we remember what we have gained and apply it to the work we do, we will continue innovating within the box—and far beyond it, too.

(A more detailed version of this review is available on my Building Creative Bridges blog.)

–Paul Signorelli

@TisforTraining 235: I’m Not Doing This Alone

entre-ed-2018--StudentShowcase
Young entrepreneurs discussing their products at the 2018 EntreEd Forum (Pittsburgh, PA, September 2018)

With T is for Training Executive Producer/Host/Cat-Herder Maurice Coleman and Regular Suspect Extraordaire/Producer/Blog Editor Jill Hurst-Wahl away (playing hooky), Substitute Guest Host Paul Signorelli and Regular-Suspect-Extraordinare Andrea Snyder absconded with the show for an hour-long exploration of how trainer-teacher-learners can help–and are already helping–prepare others (and themselves) for our ever-changing work environment.

After a brief review of a KQED Mind/Shift blog post (“Ten Jobs That Should Be Safe From Automation”), Andrea and Paul used Jonathan Nalder’s FutureWe framework (which suggests how learners and leaders can thrive in the future) to examine a variety of challenges and potential solutions to the demands we are facing in our workplace environments. Particular attention was given, during the conversation, to a) the use of library makerspaces in learning; b) libraries as resources for those seeking skills to make them more competitive in contemporary work spaces; and c) ways to foster the entrepreneurial skills that becoming increasingly important to those wanting to thrive in our changing world of work.

Among the other resources mentioned during the conversation were:

You can listen to this episode on the TalkShoe platform or through places like iTunes.  If you haven’t done so, please leave us a review on iTunes.

The T is for Training Bookshelf: “Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions”

Clark Quinn

Clark_Quinn--Millennials_Goldfish_Training_Misconceptions--book_coverThe training myths, misconceptions, and superstitions to which we subscribe are hurting us, the organizations we serve, and those served by our learners, Clark Quinn maintains throughout his wonderfully engaging new book, Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions.

Quinn’s respect for and commitment to evidence-based research, his puckish sense of humor, and his obvious commitment to setting and fostering the highest possible standards of professionalism in learning and development are on clear display throughout the book–as they were during his T is for Training conversation in Episode #230.

Highly recommended.

–A longer review of the book is available on the ATD (Association for Talent Development) Science of Learning blog.

Clark Quinn on Learning Myths and Superstitions (T is for Training #230)

Here are resources mentioned during the conversation with Clark Quinn about his book Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions: Debunking Learning Myths and Superstitions (ATD Press; 2018) on Episode #230 of T is for Training:

 

Clark Quinn: Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions: Debunking Learning Myths and Superstitions

 

 

 

George Couros: The Innovator’s Mindset

 

 

 

 

Kathy Sierra: Badass: Making Users Awesome

 

 

 

 

Julie Beck: “This Article Won’t Change Your Mind”

MindTools: “Kirkpatrick’s Four-Level Training Evaluation Model”

PsycholoGenie Staff: “Belief Perseverance”

David McRaney: “The Backfire Effect”

Clark Quinn: “Debunking Learning Myths: Millennials, Goldfish, and other Training Misconceptions”

Clark Quinn: “Learnlets” blog

Jeremy Adam Smith: “How the Science of ‘Blue Lies’ May Explain Trump’s Support: They Are a Very Particular Form of Deception That Can Build Solidarity Within Groups”

Wikipedia: “Desirable Difficulty”

Demystifying the Learning Process for Struggling Students (T is for Training #224)

Here are resources mentioned during the discussion of the KQED Mind/Shift article “5 Strategies to Demystify the Learning Process for Struggling Students,” by Deborah Farmer Kris (@dfkris) on Episode #224 of T is for Training:

brown--make_it_stickPeter Brown, Henry Roediger III, and Mark McDaniel: Make It Stick: The Science of Scucessful Learning

carey--how_we_learnBenedict Cary: How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens

Heath--Made_to_StickChip and Dan Heath: Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die

macknik--sleights_of_mindStephen Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde: Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about Our Everyday Deceptions

Medina--Brain_RulesJohn Medina: Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School

zull--art_of_changing_the_brainJames Zull: The Art of Changing the Brain: Enriching the Practice of Teaching by Exploring the Biology of Learning

The T is for Training Bookshelf: “Revolutionize Learning & Development”

Revolutionize Learning & Development. (2014). San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons and ASTD Press

Clark Quinn 

Quinn--Revolutionize_L&D--CoverClark Quinn is certainly not the first to say he is mad as hell and to urge us to not take it anymore. But in this well-researched, highly- and finely-nuanced book, he does far more than recycle old rants. He builds upon research-based evidence to show where we continue to go wrong in talent development and, more importantly, offers suggestions for changing our course(s) to the benefit of those we serve. The real winners here are the learners we will better support by adapting Quinn’s first-rate recommendations to fit our learners’ and organizations’ needs.

–This brief review, originally written as a “shelf talker” posted in the conference bookstore at the ATD 2016 International Conference & Exposition in Denver (May 2016), is re-posted here with the permission of our ATD colleagues. A longer set of reflections is available on the “Building Creative Bridges” blog.