Archive for the ‘T is for Training’ Category

CabbageAndrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl (in chat) and Maurice Coleman talked about the Computers in Libraries Conference, as well as rural librarianship (a.k.a. Andrea’s new position).  They talked about library services, staffing, programming and more.

Andrea is now at the Pioneer Library System with offices in Canandaigua, NY.  Part of the service area includes farm country, where cabbages are grown. (Hence the title of the show and photo.)

Mentioned in the show:

You can listen to this episode here.  The next show will be on April 28!  We’re skipping the 14th due to Good Friday, which is a holiday for some.

 

The Pot Of Gold At The End Of My RainbowEpisode 202 was recorded St. Patrick’s Day!  Diane Huckaby, Maurice Coleman, Kate Kosturski, and Paul Signorelli talked Play to Learn (yes, using games), the Congress bromance trip, and incorporating play into your training.  You can listen to the episode here.

 

nmc_itunesu-hrhied17finalIn this episode, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman discussed the 2017 NMC Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition. Paul is one of the folks who helped create the report, and he talked about the process. Then they discuss the report itself and industry ramifications. They made jokes, too.  You can listen to the episode here.

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For this 200th episode, Maurice Coleman, Kate Kosturski, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Buffy Hamilton.   The four (including Buffy in chat) talked about the history of the program and what has changed in training since 2008.  For example, there have been technology changes since 2008 that have truly impact training/teaching/learning.

At the end of the episode, we talked about the ALA Midwinter conference.  A list of future ALA conference sites is here.

Black top-hatA bit Hat Tip to everyone – EVERYONE – who has ever been a part of this show. Thank YOU to EVERYONE who listened to this show.  This show continues to ALL of you!

Articles mentioned:

You can listen to the show here.

John LewisOn the call were Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckaby, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  We talked about ALA Midwinter and the role of libraries as a place of facts and reliable information.  Libraries – as an institution – can be community beacons.  You can listen to the show here.

We talked about fake web sites, which can test someone’s information literacy skills such as this and this.

We also talked about if there have been changes in the activity levels in public libraries, since the inauguration.  Maurice noted that they are compiling their January statistics now and hopes to report on them during the next show.

Maurice Coleman with his pussyhatFinally, we want to thank those who are willing to engage in conversations and actions, and to bring facts into those conversations.  Also thanks to ALA and other associations for the statements they have issued.  The ALA statement is here.

Our 200th episode will be February 17.  We hope more of our T community will come and help celebrate!

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Kate Kosturski, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli (three with coughs and one with a “busted” foot).

junkPaul started us off on a conversation about the Communities That Work Partnership Playbook (Nov. 2016), focusing on page 11 (see image).  We focused on “balancing customization and standardization” in terms of training and education.  In self-directed learning, students (and trainers) need to know that the correct skills are being learned which are necessary for the workplace.

Maurice brought up a wonderful image of a honeycomb, where you provide some structure and people are free to then fill-in the structure.

We moved eventually to a long conversation about conference planning and changing from sessions to tracks.  And we ended by talking again about customized learning, with a slight detour on the topic of “ambivert.”  (See “9 Signs That You’re An Ambivert.”)

You can listen to the show here.

Soft Pastels

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Kate Kosturski and Jill Hurst-Wahl talked about some of the things that a trainer should pay attention to, noting that little things – small details – mean a lot.

For the workshop/conference organizer:

  • Appoint someone who will help each presenter understand how the technology works.
  • Tell people upfront how the person should bring his/her presentation.  USB drive? Post it online?  Should the presentation be in specific file format?
  • Tell the presenter if there will be Internet access.
  • If lunch is part of the session, what is your expectation for how long it well be and ho the time will be used?

For the trainer:

  • Get there early so you have time to test the technology.
  • Make friends with the technology person.  Be sure to ask lots of questions about how that setup works.
  • Have a backup of your presentation on different media and in the cloud.
  • Make sure your presentation is in a normal/frequently used format.
  • Make friends with the facilities person. This is the person who can help with physical resources (e.g., heat, chairs, water, room setup).
  • Be clear on how you will handle questions. Do you want questions as they come up or at the end?
  • Tell participants how you want them to interact (or not) with their technology during the session.
  • If the session includes lunch, will it be a working lunch?
  • How many breaks will you give participants?
  • Test your presentation on a projection unit before the workshop/presentation. Is the font color readable?  Is the font large enough? Is the background distracting?
  • Bonus (not on the recording): Use fonts that are good for accessibility.  For some with print disabilities, a san serif font (e.g., Tahoma, Franklin Gothic, Arial) are good to use.  (No, do not use Comic Sans or any of “fun” font that can be difficult to read, even if it is a san serif font.)

You can listen to the show here, and hear details about this show title!

Happy Summer Solstice Northern HemisphereOn the call were Andrea Snyder, Kate Kosturski, Michael Porter, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman. We began with the topic:  How do we connect with our learners, whether it is a workshop or a speaking gig or webinar?  What tips or tricks do we use?

As background, Jill has been listening to a nearly two-hour interview with Seal (the singer).   At one point, Seal talks about advice he was given early in his career.  He had a hit (“Crazy“) and was on a popular music TV show in England.  A colleague told him that the performance was “good”, but that he hadn’t connected.  She said Seal would know when he had done it.

Tips mentioned were:

  • Provide some background on yourself to help build rapport.
  • Give the learners power by engaging them in the conversation.
  • Food! – In all seriousness, it helps people be comfortable and know that their needs will be met.
  • Assigned seating, so that people aren’t with their usual cliques.

How do you know that you “lost the room”?

  • Are people looking at you, every once in a while?
  • Scan the room.  Is the behavior in the room changing?
  • Is there someone who is a “canary”?  For example, someone who unconsciously will nod her/his head “yes” when the person gets it.

Reading the room is a soft-skill. Can it be taught?

It was pointed out that sometimes you have to power-through a training, even if you’ve lost the room.

Can you have someone in the audience that gives you feedback or ensures that there is engagement?

Managing the flow of the training is a soft-skill that a trainer needs to learn.  Managing the flow means the person needs to be flexible and nimble.  The person needs to know the content well and be able to alter priorities on-the-fly, if necessary.

One other soft skill is learning how to hide the butterflies (or worries).

What do you do before you present to an audience that you don’t know?

  • Take a few deep, focused breathes.
  • Close your eyes and do deep breathing.
  • Put on lip balm and hand lotion, and check your zipper.
  • Empty your pockets.  (Your pants or outfit will look better.)
  • Go to the bathroom.  If you have a lavalier mic, turn it off or take it off.
  • Take some time to yourself right before.  Center down and calm yourself.

You can listen to the show here.

IFLA WLIC2016After a three-minute episode on Sept. 2 (Too Beautiful Outside), the crew bounced back with a full Episode 193. On the call were Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckaby, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman.

Here are links to items mentioned in the show:

You can listen to the entire show here.

brussell sproutsThe groups talked about how do you pave the way for training to be well received? How to create effective resources for an unknown user group? They also talked about ALA and our dream cities for possible locations. One the call were Kate Kosturski, Andrea Snyder, and Maurice Coleman.

You can listen to the episode here.