Archive for the ‘T is for Training’ Category

Kinetic 1042It’s no surprise to any of us that we have had to question a lot of our assumptions over the past few months; and it’s even less surprising that reversing our assumptions and taking actions or working under conditions that are the opposite of what we are used to doing has produced some positive results.  What’s are opposites?

The opposite -With this technique, you consider the exact opposite of what you would normally think or do.  For example, libraries are considered safe places.  What is the opposite of being a safe place and what ideas does that generate?  This can lead to some wild stuff and also some very interesting ideas that would be worth investigating.
We began by talking about our assumptions when the stay at home COVID-19 orders started and took it from there.  A lively show of busting assumptions and thinking of opposites.  On the call were a silent Maurice Coleman, Tom Haymes, Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli.

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UntitledOn this week’s call were Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Tom Haymes.  Maurice began by listing off things that have occurred since January. Wow. Even though our national news is causing us angst, there is some good news in our libraries as they begin to reopen. (Or this isn’t good news if you are part of #CloseTheLibraries.) At any rate, as trainers-teachers-learners, we talked about what this re-opening means for our libraries and academic institutions in terms of teaching and learning. Give a listen then join us on June 18 for our next show.

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Living Desert Zoo and GardensThe T is for Training crew is taking tonight off. We need a breather from all of our virtual meetings. We’ll back back on June 4, 9:00 p.m. ET.

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014We are now in week “forever minus X” of stay at home orders, working from home, virtual meetings, virtual teaching, etc., and wondering what our institutions will be like when our communities open back up (as if they have been totally closed). Where have we seen good uses of training, distance learning, virtual conference, online delivery of services, etc.? Where have we seen good pivots from on-site to online?  Where have we seen institutions expand what they are doing and perhaps gaining a bigger presence? What do we want our libraries to remember or keep doing?  On the call were Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and a silent Maurice Coleman.

We mentioned:
  • 2-minute video of a son helping his mother with a Zoom meeting
  • Tim’s tweets for the National Cowboy Museum
  • People getting used to using online tools for communication and growing in their comfort with it
  • People – rural and urban – have similar experiences through digital technology
  • The need for broadband stimulus legislation
  • National Digital Inclusion Alliance
  • Libraries and schools making wifi available in their parking lots
  • Libraries and Schools Are Bridging the Digital Divide During the Coronavirus Pandemic
  • K-12 schools sending school buses, with wifi, out info the community to help students access the Internet
  • Level of commitment and creativity among peers
  • The reversal of assumptions about how to schedule online training events (i.e., fast turn around works!)
  • Perspectives 2020, 24-hour global conference
  • Your best resources are your colleagues
  • Be kind to each other. and yourself.
  • Imagine how much less connected we would have been in 2010.
  • Rethink the normal for how people participate in online meetings.

This was a fun show!

Two phones video conferencingOn the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Diane Hackabay.  We’re now several weeks into social distancing and working from home.  Many of our meetings have moved into online video platforms.  In addition, professional conferences are moving online.  In this lively conversation, we discussed and ranted about online conferences and online meetings. We talked about what we hope these events might be in the future, as well as our frustration with some events that are occurring today.  We have a vision for the perfect platform and hope a company is paying attention and will develop it.

This was a fun conversation and we will do it again in two weeks (May 7, 9 p.m. ET).

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Vintage TypewriterOn the call were Tom Haymes, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Laura Fothergill (in chat), and Maurice Coleman.  Note that Tom has some tech problems at the start, but we got it straightened out, which led to an interesting conversation about digital learning platforms for live classes (e.g., Zoom, WebEx, Shindig, Canvas,Big Blue Button).  We then pivoted and talked about Discovering Digital Humanity, which Tom wrote.  It was lively!

Our next show will be on April 23, 9 p.m. ET.

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The T is for Training GngOn the call were Tom Haymes (first timer), Paul Signorelli, Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.  Our topics was born out of the ShapingEDU face-to-face unconference, which occurred two weeks ago, and that had to shift online due to COVID-19.  How did they rapidly transition from onsite to online learning?

We began with talking about ShapingEDU, then shifted to talking about moving face-to-face campus classes online, and then to impact of bad Internet access.  We covered a lot of ground!

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How to wash your handsOn the call were Chris DeChristofaro, Maurice Coleman, and Jill Hurst-Wahl. We talked about the topic that is on everyone’s mind – COVID-19 – and focused on the things our libraries need to be thinking about. And in the middle of the episode, Chris learned that his library will be closed tomorrow because of the virus. Yes, this “cow dung” is real!

As we talked, we mentioned these tips (and likely a few more):

  • Wash your hands a lot!
  • Keep equipment and surfaces clean.
  • Understand how to communicate with your staff.  Have good lines of communication (email, robocalls, etc.).
  • Have a “what do we do if” plan for your staff.
  • Provide staff resources (e.g., tech, access, files, etc.), in case staff have to work from home.  Do people need secure access?
  • Monitor your Internet and check that it is handling increased traffic.
  • Consider limiting tech access, if you need to accommodate more people.
  • Try to understand the impact of businesses and schools closing on your services and usage.
  • Have access to verifiable information and share that information with others.
  • Create COVID-19 resources for your community on the library web site.

These are serious times. Please be safe and join us in two weeks (March 26) for our next episode.

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NODTonight was a continuation of episode 260. We used written comments from Diane Huckabay, which she submitted for that episode, to fuel the conversation. From her email, we picked up on diversity, security, privacy, and ignorance. On the call were Chris DeChristofaro, Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.   You can listen to the episode on TalkShoe and through your favorite podcast service.

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Innovation Studio rulesPaul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman talked about an innovator’s mindset in teaching, learning and training.

Paul graciously wrote a review of the book on which this episode is based.  Listen to the episode, read the review…read the other review he points to…then come back in two weeks for the next T is for Training on Feb. 27, 9 p.m. ET.