Archive for the ‘Training Podcast’ Category

4748 days ago, the first T is for Training happened. I had an idea to start a podcast for library trainers, since we were usually the lone wolf’s in our places of work.

It was a pilot show with three friends, Beth, Bobbi and Jennifer, and we talked about 23 Things and learning while playing (remember that?), Active Shooter Training (unfortunately still needed) and a Trainer Bi*ch Session (also still needed.) With show links of Delicio.us *RIP*

Also, the very cool Trainer’s Alphabet was discussed on FriendFeed (RIP) Here is a link to the two August 2008 posts about the pilot show and the Trainer’s Alphabet. August 2008 T is for Training Posts

Unfortunately, those older shows, along with the first 150 episodes or so, are lost in the ether.If you happen to have any copies of our older shows, drop us a line!

This show as survived MANY changes. Life changes. Job Changes. Support Changes. But we still try to do something useful every two weeks (most of the time.)

The real first show took place on September 12th, 2008. But the show on August 29th is the first place T is for Training happened.

It has been a long and fun thirteen years and counting.

Thank all (five) of you for listening, and I hope you all continue to support us with your kind words and thoughts.

Also JOIN US on a Thursday night. You know you want to…

Although there will be no recording of T is for Training this evening (brief holiday break to give Maurice Coleman, our Cat Herder in Chief a chance to spend time with family), there is quite a nice line-up for July/August 2021 on T is for Training:

Thursday, July 15, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–R. David Lankes, author of the newly-released Forged in War: How a Century of War Created Today’s Information Society, will join us for a discussion about what trainer-teacher-learners can learn from the book.

Jill Hurst-Wahl

Thursday, July 29, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–Our own Jill Hurst-Wahl, who will receive the Special Libraries Association’s John Cotton Dana lifetime-achievement recognition award in a public online ceremony August 3 and who has posted a set of reflections on her blog (“Personal Good News and Contributing to Your Profession”), will be with us for a conversation about volunteerism, professional development, and training-teaching-learning.

Thursday, August 12, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–Clark Quinn, who has been with us for some great conversations over the past few years, returns for a discussion about Learning Science for Instructional Designers: From Cognition to Application (released in April 2021).

James Richardson

Thursday, August 26, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–James Richardson, a Sacramento-based “writer, farmhand, Episcopal priest,” will join us for a conversation about getting from no to yes in training-teaching-learning. There is, of course, a backstory here: Jim and I worked together at The UCLA Daily Bruin a couple of lifetimes ago; we recently reconnected, and his story about how he moved from full-time work as a journalist to being a minister by learning to move “from no to yes” struck me as being a wonderful jumping off point for this episode of T is for Training. And yes, he continues to write: he has an amazing book (his second) coming out next year: “The Abolitionist’s Journal, due for release in fall 2022, is the story of his anti-slavery ancestor who used his house on the Underground Railroad, served as the white chaplain to a Black Union regiment in the Civil War, and then with his family founded a college for the freed slaves in Austin, Texas (Samuel Huston College).”

–Posted by Paul Signorelli

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I had the pleasure of sitting down at the 2019 ATD ICE with Paul Meshanko, who is all about respect and how it is a powerful tool for success in the workplace.  Paul spoke at the conference about The Respect Effect: Reaching Beyond Tolerance to Build an Inclusive Workplace which is also the title of his book: The Respect Effect

https://www.amazon.com/Respect-Effect-Neuroleadership-Productive-Workplace/dp/0071816097/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1367956824&sr=1-3

You can download the interview HERE

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Please enjoy the interview with Paul about respect, workplace conditions and other great topics.

Paul Meshanko’s Book The Respect Effect

T is for Training can be found on twitter @tisfortraining and on the web at tisfortraining.wordpress.com

 

Interview with Ken Phillips at the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exposition from May 20th, 2019.   The interview can be downloaded HERE.

KenPhillips_headshot

Ken was gracious enough to spend a little time talking about evaluations, the PLA Method, learning analytics, predictive measurement, what most people get wrong with evaluations and his upcoming book Going from Training to Application Using Predictive Learning Analytics on evaluation backed by analytical data via a predictive model.

His website, Predictive Learning Analytics (PLA) lays out the methodology:

The mission of PLA is to provide L&D professionals with a systematic, credible and repeatable process for maximizing the value of learning and development investments by measuring, monitoring and managing the amount of scrap learning associated with those investments.

Contact him either via the Predictive Learning Analytics website or email at ken at phillipsassociates dot com

Side Note:  I sometimes have problems remembering people’s names.  Faces I know names, not so much.   Names can take a while to settle in the database.   This interview was so wonderful, I would talk about it and try to remember the name of the interview subject.  I merely said “the evaluation guru” and two different people said, oh, you mean Ken Phillips.

Here is Ken Phillips.

T is for Training can be found on twitter @tisfortraining and here on the blog tisfortraining.wordpress.com

 

 

So today at #ATD2019 for the show was awesome. Here goes the bullet points of my day:

Sat in on the Chad Udell @visualrinse presser about his book  Shock of the New. Hope to have him on the show to talk about his work including how you can use his 30 question rubric to help you evaluate your organization and how technology can be used by your organization.

Sat in on the Paul Smith (@paulsmithatd) discusses his new book Learning While Working which focuses on successful training while in a particular position.   His interview will be coming up on the show soon.

After lunch and some time in a session by Bob Pike (@bobpikectt) where he trained some trainers. And did so with style and humor. Paul Signorelli @trainersleaders has the notes about that session and a session with Jamie Millard/Frank Satterwaite authors of the book Becoming a Can-Do Leader. If we are lucky we will get them on an upcoming episode of the podcast.

Then a string of great serendipitous interviews with:

  • Paul Meshanko (@paulmeshanko) about the keys to respect. An organization were the employees respect each other is a more productive workplace with an engaged workforce not focused on their limbic brain. That two part interview will be up soon.
  • Ken Phillips (site to come) talked about evaluation and how to build a strong evaluation tool and his work on the 12 questions to effectively evaluate the transfer of learning. He taught me that what I don’t know about evaluation would fill several volumes. Two parts up soon.
  • Dr. Chan Lee (@hrdream) from Seoul National University talked about AI and that AI won’t take away jobs but allow job restructuring to free workers from mundane tasks.
  • Dr. Claretha Hughes and I talked about the intersection of talent management and technology and how companies can keep their people if they treat them like technology. Her most recent book is called Workforce Inter-Personnel Diversity: The Power to Influence Human Productivity and Career Development.

I was truly lucky to meet such a group of smart and engaged people today. I do need to clean up some sound, including two different breaks for convention center unexpected furniture movement.

We will be talking about some of these subjects on the next episode of T is for Training this Friday at 2pm ET.

Inspiration or distraction?

Inspiration or Distraction?

This week’s topic was inspired by the blog post “Attention, distraction, deep work and burnout” by Jill.  On the call were Buffy Hamilton, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Laura Fothergill and Maurice Coleman.

Buffy noted that some K-12 school districts do allow students to bring their own devices into the classroom.  However, she did notice some students this past year who became very engrossed in their mobile devices during lunch and never did anything else during lunchtime.

One other distraction is when people monopolize the conversation.  See “What teens resent: Classrooms controlled by students rather than teachers“.

Paul pointed to his post Social Media Feast and Fast: Disconnecting for a Day.

We talked about distraction in library training, K-12, and higher education.  Paul and Laura provided tools that people can use for digital note-taking which include Twitter, Prezi,  OneNote, and Sway…and a myriad of other things.

The show – which contains much more than what’s in these notes – can be listened to here.  The unedited chat – or as we say…the back channel – from the show is here.  Paul felt that others might want to read the chat, which was very focused this week.

Additional Resources:

Outside the Denver Art Museum

Outside the Denver Art Museum

On the call were Andrea Snyder, Kate Kosturski, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman. The topic for today was “The Size of the Room.”  How do we extend and expand a conference conversation easily, quickly and at a low cost (or free).

  • Using social media, one easy why is to create a unique hashtag and use that hashtag for a Twitter chat after the event is over.
  • Do post-conference recap sessions for librarians in your area (geographic or topic).  This could be done face-to-face or online (virtual).
  • Do pecha kuchas for staff.  One group creates a slidedeck with slides from different sessions that people want to to discuss.
  • Rather than being at a distance and saying that you’re not there, consider asking how people at the event want you to interact with them in the moment.

Paul reminded us that it is a room with an open door, which means you can enter or not, and enter when you want to.

Paul’s takeaway from the Association for Talent Development (ATD) Annual Conference is to end conversations with action plans, so that things occur. This moves people to be doers.  This is actually something Paul has had us do on T is for Training.

Paul mentioned the closing keynote by Jeremy Gutsche.  A version of his talk is in Youtube:

Andrea’s takeaway from the Public Library Association (PLA) Conference, included these topics:

  • Cultural awareness and inclusivity as topics of sessions
  • Empathy
  • Libraries as creation spaces, which is not just technology
  • The fact that everyone has biases

PLA organized a handout and post-conference conversations through Facebook so help people extend the learning.

Andrea mentioned this talk from Verna Myers, who was the “Big Ideas” keynote speaker:

Recaps of the conference are at http://rcplpla2016.blogspot.com/.

BTW we invested a new term, which is “pottycast.”  You’ll have to listen to the show to understand why or how.

You can listen to the show here.

Fort Worth Public Library -Central- ADA accomodations (3)On the call were Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl and Diane Huckabay.  We talked about making accommodations to address the needs of all learners.  You can listen to the show here (31 minutes).

Resources:

purple rain[Or…Training is an Art…]

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Kate Kosturski, and Jill Hurst-Wahl (all members of the “usual suspects”).  Paul proposed that we take about the Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning.  The six disciplines are:
  • Define Business Outcomes
  • Design the Complete Experience
  • Deliver for Application
  • Drive Learning Transfer
  • Deploy Performance Support
  • Document Results

One of the problems discussed was “learning scrap”, which is when training participants don’t use what they learn.  (Learning scraps are like food scraps.) We also talked about how we might assess training.

The group then talked about creativity, Prince, and making training better.  This led to a conversation on the art of training.

And somehow we ended with a free flowing conversation including an injury flow chart!

You can listen to the show here.

Resources:
  • The Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning  (read the summary)
  • Revolutionize Learning & Development: Performance and Innovation Strategy for the Information Age

InspirationToday’s topic is described as  “I hate you, now go away” or “How to engage your staff and public in lifelong learning.”  Perhaps a better title might be “inspiration time.”  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Kate Kosturski, Megan Johnson, and Jennifer Wright.

Relevant resources on this are: