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Microphone

Microphone

Due to various holidays and the schedule of our host, Maurice, this is the T is for Training schedule for the remainder of 2017. We will be chatting and recording at 2 p.m. ET on:

  • Oct. 13
  • Oct. 27
  • Nov. 17
  • December 8th.
  • Dec. 22 (Our year-end show)

Our first show in 2018 will be on Jan. 8. We’ll then aim to record every two weeks throughout 2018.

T is for Training exists for YOU and always does better when YOU are involved.  Please consider calling-in and being part of the conversation.  The phone number for calling in is  (724) 444-7444. When prompted enter the Call ID: 24719.  If you want to join us on chat (the conversation behind the conversation), you can do that through the TalkShoe web site.  Yes, you can just participate in chat, but then you wouldn’t have the pleasure of interrupting Paul when he talks!

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September 29th 2017 programming information.

Hey Folks:

There will be no T is for Training today. Life and other commitments keep us from taping today.

Join us in two weeks on October 13th 2017 for show 213 and a ton of engaging talk.

See you then.

@baldgeekinmd

 

Paul_at_NMC

Paul (on the right) at the New Media Consortium conference

On the call were Jodie Borgerding (new to the show!), Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman. We began by talking about library signage and the recommendation of libraries doing a yearly signage audit.  We then moved to talking about the digital face of the library.

Web sites mentioned:

You can listen to the episode through Talkshoe.

BTW Even though Paul Signorelli was not on the call, we want to toss him some “love” by sharing the photo we used.

Addendum: Jill sent Henderson County Public Library a Twitter message to tell them about their contact page and they fixed it right away!  Thanks, HCPL.

Sometimes it is worth telling someone (or an institution) what you think is obvious, because it may not actually be obvious.

Jill's view while on T is for TrainingAfter a hiatus due to the November holidays, the T is for Training crew was back at it for the last show of 2016.  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  Today’s topic built upon the Association for Talent Development‘s Employee Learning Week and was “who might be a champion of learning?” We began listing job functions and organizations that are champions. We noted that learners can become self-directed champions of learning.  Along the way, we talked about the need for self-care (and referenced both Heather Plett and Episode 163).  Self-care has been a recurring theme, as has been the power of networking. While we are all outstanding networkers, we are not always outstanding in terms of self-care (something which we acknowledged we need to pay more attention to).

Along the way, Paul mentioned the book The Nudge (his last book reference for 2016) and we engaged in a bit of “poking” at each other. Ah friends!

You can hear this episode here.  Paul created a Storify of tweets about our conversation, which can be viewed here.

Our next call will be on January 6, 2017, then on Feb. 3, Feb 17 and Mar. 3.  We’re skipping Jan 20 because many of the T is for Training regulars will be at the ALA Midwinter Conference.

Mock ShockAt a recent workshop, Jill was shocked to hear that most of the techniques we use as learners to reinforce what we’ve learned do not work.  She was referred to Dunlosky’s article for more information.

Dunlosky J, Rawson KA, Marsh EJ, Nathan MJ, Willingham DT. “Improving Students’ Learning With Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions From Cognitive and Educational Psychology.”Psychol Sci Public Interest. 2013 Jan;14(1):4-58. doi: 10.1177/1529100612453266.

Dunlosky and colleagues looked at ten learning techniques which a student could do on his/her own.  Those techniques are:

  • Elaborative interrogation
  • Self-explanation
  • Summarization
  • Highlighting/underlining
  • Keyword mnemonic
  • Imagery for text
  • Rereading
  • Practice testing
  • Distributed practice
  • Interleaved practice

They assessed each technique for its utility or efficacy.  Unfortunately, some of the techniques we have been told to use do not work unless they are implemented to support a specific way of studying. For example:

…highlighting does little to boost performance.  It may help when students have the knowledge needed to highlight more effectively, or when texts are difficult, but it may actually hurt performance on higher-level tasks that require inference making.

Yikes!  Clearly, there is more to know and this study provides that information. For each technique, the authors describe it, describe its effects, talk about issues for implementation, and give an overall assessment.
As teachers/trainers/instructors, it would be useful if we could recommend the best technique for the situation and this article could help us to just that.

The Dunlosky article is available from Sage Journals, which you may be able to access through your library.  You can should also be able to order a copy through interlibrary loan.

Matt Abrahams did this 58-minute talk at Stanford University in which he gives techniques to help us communicate better in spontaneous situations. As trainers, one specific time we’re in spontaneous situations is during Q&A.  His tips will work in that situation and in many others.

Julian Treasure has given several TED Talks all related to sound. This 10-minute talk is on how to speak so that people – a person, a small group or a large audience – want to listen.  As trainers, we want our learners to pay attention and listen.  This video may give you tips to help you be a better speaker.

Thomas A. Angelo and K. Patricia Cross co-wrote the book Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers, 2nd Edition. Angelo was in Syracuse in mid-October to give a workshop on the topic, which T is for Training regular, Jill, attended. (Presentation slidesHandout.)  Angelo is a truly engaging instructor.  It can be tough to be an instructor teaching a roomful of instructors (because we’re opinionated and hard to impress), yet he showed us that we all could learn to be better in the classroom.

Assessing students in a classroom – or workshop – situation is something every trainer or instructor needs to do. Angelo provides ideas on how to make assessment part of the instructor.  He also talks about how to obtain actionable feedback from our students.

If assessment is a topic of interest to you, go find this book at your library.  If you interested in this topic, but don’t want to read a book, look at this handout for a few specific techniques.

 

 

“It’s the things you learn after you know it all that count.” – Coach John Wooden

Rarely do we hear about training from a student’s perspective long after the lessons have been given, and the real “training” has sunk in. This 25-minute podcast is an interview with NBA Star Bill Walton, who learned from one of the best coaches who ever lived, John Wooden.  As a student, what did Walton learn from Wooden? And how did Wooden teach?  And – in trivia – what is Walton’s connection to libraries?

Load this Growth Show podcast on your mobile device, go for a walk, and give it a listen.  (It is available through Soundcloud, iTunes and Google Play.)

Razer OSVR Open-Source Virtual Reality for GamingKate Kosturski guest hosted episode 195 and found that she was the only one of the call. Having been to NYC ComiCon, she did a short talk on virtual reality. And left us with this question: What affect will virtual reality (VR) have on libraries and library training?