Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Mock ShockAt a recent workshop, Jill was shocked to hear that most of the techniques we use as learners to reinforce what we’ve learned do not work.  She was referred to Dunlosky’s article for more information.

Dunlosky J, Rawson KA, Marsh EJ, Nathan MJ, Willingham DT. “Improving Students’ Learning With Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions From Cognitive and Educational Psychology.”Psychol Sci Public Interest. 2013 Jan;14(1):4-58. doi: 10.1177/1529100612453266.

Dunlosky and colleagues looked at ten learning techniques which a student could do on his/her own.  Those techniques are:

  • Elaborative interrogation
  • Self-explanation
  • Summarization
  • Highlighting/underlining
  • Keyword mnemonic
  • Imagery for text
  • Rereading
  • Practice testing
  • Distributed practice
  • Interleaved practice

They assessed each technique for its utility or efficacy.  Unfortunately, some of the techniques we have been told to use do not work unless they are implemented to support a specific way of studying. For example:

…highlighting does little to boost performance.  It may help when students have the knowledge needed to highlight more effectively, or when texts are difficult, but it may actually hurt performance on higher-level tasks that require inference making.

Yikes!  Clearly, there is more to know and this study provides that information. For each technique, the authors describe it, describe its effects, talk about issues for implementation, and give an overall assessment.
As teachers/trainers/instructors, it would be useful if we could recommend the best technique for the situation and this article could help us to just that.

The Dunlosky article is available from Sage Journals, which you may be able to access through your library.  You can should also be able to order a copy through interlibrary loan.

Matt Abrahams did this 58-minute talk at Stanford University in which he gives techniques to help us communicate better in spontaneous situations. As trainers, one specific time we’re in spontaneous situations is during Q&A.  His tips will work in that situation and in many others.

Julian Treasure has given several TED Talks all related to sound. This 10-minute talk is on how to speak so that people – a person, a small group or a large audience – want to listen.  As trainers, we want our learners to pay attention and listen.  This video may give you tips to help you be a better speaker.

Thomas A. Angelo and K. Patricia Cross co-wrote the book Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers, 2nd Edition. Angelo was in Syracuse in mid-October to give a workshop on the topic, which T is for Training regular, Jill, attended. (Presentation slidesHandout.)  Angelo is a truly engaging instructor.  It can be tough to be an instructor teaching a roomful of instructors (because we’re opinionated and hard to impress), yet he showed us that we all could learn to be better in the classroom.

Assessing students in a classroom – or workshop – situation is something every trainer or instructor needs to do. Angelo provides ideas on how to make assessment part of the instructor.  He also talks about how to obtain actionable feedback from our students.

If assessment is a topic of interest to you, go find this book at your library.  If you interested in this topic, but don’t want to read a book, look at this handout for a few specific techniques.

 

 

“It’s the things you learn after you know it all that count.” – Coach John Wooden

Rarely do we hear about training from a student’s perspective long after the lessons have been given, and the real “training” has sunk in. This 25-minute podcast is an interview with NBA Star Bill Walton, who learned from one of the best coaches who ever lived, John Wooden.  As a student, what did Walton learn from Wooden? And how did Wooden teach?  And – in trivia – what is Walton’s connection to libraries?

Load this Growth Show podcast on your mobile device, go for a walk, and give it a listen.  (It is available through Soundcloud, iTunes and Google Play.)

Razer OSVR Open-Source Virtual Reality for GamingKate Kosturski guest hosted episode 195 and found that she was the only one of the call. Having been to NYC ComiCon, she did a short talk on virtual reality. And left us with this question: What affect will virtual reality (VR) have on libraries and library training?

brussell sproutsThe groups talked about how do you pave the way for training to be well received? How to create effective resources for an unknown user group? They also talked about ALA and our dream cities for possible locations. One the call were Kate Kosturski, Andrea Snyder, and Maurice Coleman.

You can listen to the episode here.

 

Revolutionize Learning & Development. (2014). San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons and ASTD Press

Clark Quinn 

Quinn--Revolutionize_L&D--CoverClark Quinn is certainly not the first to say he is mad as hell and to urge us to not take it anymore. But in this well-researched, highly- and finely-nuanced book, he does far more than recycle old rants. He builds upon research-based evidence to show where we continue to go wrong in talent development and, more importantly, offers suggestions for changing our course(s) to the benefit of those we serve. The real winners here are the learners we will better support by adapting Quinn’s first-rate recommendations to fit our learners’ and organizations’ needs.

–This brief review, originally written as a “shelf talker” posted in the conference bookstore at the ATD 2016 International Conference & Exposition in Denver (May 2016), is re-posted here with the permission of our ATD colleagues. A longer set of reflections is available on the “Building Creative Bridges” blog.

 

ASTD Handbook: The Definitive Reference for Training & Development. (2014). Alexandria: ASTD Press

Elaine Biech, editor 

ASTD_Handbook--CoverIf the title doesn’t already say all it all, let’s go one step further: Elaine Biech is one of our great ATD (Association for Talent Development) resources, and the Handbook is a treasured, foundational part of my talent-development book collection. Well organized and comprehensive in its survey of all aspects of talent development, the book makes nearly 100 of our greatest colleagues/mentors accessible to us within one volume. Whether you use it as an encyclopedia (exploring topics on an as-needed basis) or decide to read it cover-to-cover (and there’s no reason why you can’t do both), it’s a cherished must-have book.

–This brief review, originally written as a “shelf talker” posted in the conference bookstore at the ATD 2016 International Conference & Exposition in Denver (May 2016), is re-posted here with the permission of our ATD colleagues. 

The Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning: How to Turn Training and Development into Business Results (3rd edition). (2015). Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons and ATD Press

Roy V.H. Pollock, Andrew McK. Jefferson, and Calhoun Wick 

9781118647998_front.pdfWhen you sit down to read The Six Disciplines, you’ll want to have a highlighter nearby: every page of this book bursts with wonderful guidance and stories that remind us talent development [aka training-teaching-learning-doing], at its best, is a results-driven endeavor. Having been tremendously influenced by the first edition when the Six Disciplines phenomenon was initially gaining steam, I found myself falling in love with the book all over again in its latest iteration; it’s like meeting an old friend who had a first-rate makeover none of us realized was necessary. Glad the authors continue to build on their earlier successes.

–This brief review, originally written as a “shelf talker” posted in the conference bookstore at the ATD 2016 International Conference & Exposition in Denver (May 2016), is re-posted here with the permission of our ATD colleagues.