Why yes, I do.

This was another inspiring day at the ATD Conference and Exposition here in Washington DC.

The day started with the annual State of the Association briefing this morning with ATD’s @tonybingham @rosevelezsmith and Charles Fred. (covered here)

After that, I wandered around the conference and found some great people to talk to about their learning, training, and talent management work. Their cleaned up interviews will be coming soon to this space.

I continue to be inspired by the passion for the work and the depth of knowledge of the good people I interviewed today. 

They were:

Finally, in the couldn’t interview them today but will try in the future category:

  • Craig C. Clayton @craigbclayton with a good chicken story;
  • Justin Brusino @atdlearntech talked about some ways to collaborate; and
  • Ryan Changcoco @atdmanagement talked about ATD’s upcoming Wayback Training Videos that should be out this summer to advertise the upcoming ATD TechKnowledge Conference in 2020.

Thanks to all the people mentioned and to all of those who provided the energy of their presence today.

If I talked to you and you didn’t make this list I apologize profusely.

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Some notes from the @ATD State of the Association Conference briefing featuring @tonybingham ATD President & CEO, Charles Fred, Current ATD Board Chair and Rose Velez-Smith Board Chair-Elect.

NB: The bullet points below are a collection of the tweets sent from the press briefing this morning. All quotes are from one of the three participants. I apologize for not being able to properly attribute each quote to one of the three speakers, but I thought it was more important to capture the essence of the quick moving conversation. Thank you for understanding.

The highlights: 

  • State of the Association This looks like one of the largest ATD conferenceATD conferences ever.
  • Different membership levels to reflect greater diversity in learning roles in organizations
  • you want to hang onto the things that work but keep an eye on the new to move the association forward.
  • The association focus is aligned with c level concerns about talent recruitment and retention.
  • CPLP certification is an international certification mindful of the cultural similarities and uniqueness of different markets.
  • We need to make sure that there is a culture of continual learning (like libraries!) that will help all talent adapt to future changes.
  • Learning is not something is done to you. How do we get individuals to get proactive about learning and receptive to learning.
  • Shift of organizations into learning organizations. (Libraries have been doing this for decades MD has learning libraries method of organizational thinking.)
  • People come to ATD for career development. The Association has to continue to provide resources that support that goal here at the conference.
  • How do the people that influence the business the most get a seat at the table? How do you draw others to the table?
  • ATD worked for years to get @Oprah to come to ATD. Demonstrates persistence, generosity, low ego and relatability. And she is one of the most influential people in the world. How do you NOT learn from her.
  • ATD continues to create new channels of content with a new person at the association and taking a look at the content segmentation structure and see how we can drive more people to more relevant to them content.
  • ATD is taking a deep dive into the UX and ATD’s current content organization. They have hired someone at the association that will focus on this specific area of member support.
  • Was the increase in conference attendance this year and last year because of the speakers?… Pres. Obama and Oprah Having them speak at ATD put the stamp of approval to the conference to those who don’t know about ATD
  • ATD continues to protect organization neutrality even though a few thought that Pres Obama and Oprah were more political choices not leadership choices for speakers.
  • ATD continues to work on increasing the international representation at the highest levels of the association. Being mindful of the logistics, how to keep the international perspective on the association’s radar.

So today at #ATD2019 for the show was awesome. Here goes the bullet points of my day:

Sat in on the Chad Udell @visualrinse presser about his book  Shock of the New. Hope to have him on the show to talk about his work including how you can use his 30 question rubric to help you evaluate your organization and how technology can be used by your organization.

Sat in on the Paul Smith (@paulsmithatd) discusses his new book Learning While Working which focuses on successful training while in a particular position.   His interview will be coming up on the show soon.

After lunch and some time in a session by Bob Pike (@bobpikectt) where he trained some trainers. And did so with style and humor. Paul Signorelli @trainersleaders has the notes about that session and a session with Jamie Millard/Frank Satterwaite authors of the book Becoming a Can-Do Leader. If we are lucky we will get them on an upcoming episode of the podcast.

Then a string of great serendipitous interviews with:

  • Paul Meshanko (@paulmeshanko) about the keys to respect. An organization were the employees respect each other is a more productive workplace with an engaged workforce not focused on their limbic brain. That two part interview will be up soon.
  • Ken Phillips (site to come) talked about evaluation and how to build a strong evaluation tool and his work on the 12 questions to effectively evaluate the transfer of learning. He taught me that what I don’t know about evaluation would fill several volumes. Two parts up soon.
  • Dr. Chan Lee (@hrdream) from Seoul National University talked about AI and that AI won’t take away jobs but allow job restructuring to free workers from mundane tasks.
  • Dr. Claretha Hughes and I talked about the intersection of talent management and technology and how companies can keep their people if they treat them like technology. Her most recent book is called Workforce Inter-Personnel Diversity: The Power to Influence Human Productivity and Career Development.

I was truly lucky to meet such a group of smart and engaged people today. I do need to clean up some sound, including two different breaks for convention center unexpected furniture movement.

We will be talking about some of these subjects on the next episode of T is for Training this Friday at 2pm ET.

Paul Smith (@paulsmithatd) discusses his new book Learning While Working which focuses on successful training while in a particular position.   I was lucky enough to hear his briefing and record an interview with him.  That interview is coming up soon on this same @tisfortraining station.

Paul Smith

NB — This is an edited stream of consciousness note taking.  This only scratches the surface of the book.

Many places treat OTJ (On The Job) training as an episode of survivor, sink or swim.

Organizations should treat OTJ training just like regular structured training.  It should have consistent goals and outcomes just like a successful n or outside of the traditional classroom setting.

Known objectives work to keep younger learners engaged.  Keep them in the drivers seat with upfront objectives shared at beginning of job cycle.

Good SOTJ (Structured On The Job) training program builds on a specific job role not the whole company. if there is just a sink or swim training mentality, the good people leave after four years.

Best to have specific tasks not just general Know excel but know how to x in excel.

There are two things that all good SOTJ training programs have:

Number One:

Sit down with specific role and identify specific and measurable things to be considered competent.  Doesn’t matter the size of the job.  Both learner and organization must know specific tasks to ensure learner success.  This list is a living document, not set in stone for eternity.

Must be specific measurable competencies in a position.

It can be a painful but beneficial journey to make organization position skills consistent throughout an organization leaving room for customization and local enhancement.

Once you do that you go to Two which is:

How do you know that they are competent?   Must evaluate observable output so someone else can evaluate position competence.

Don’t think of On The Job Training as that but think of a  competency based training.  While there is a place in the workplace for classroom training, job specific training is different from the information dissemination class training experience.

OTJ should be competency based learning to help you the worker establish a sense of competence in what you need to know to successfully do you job.   Use the measurable items to determine success of training and program.

You can use a competency based learning program that is completely  organized and viewed up front can be used as a recruitment tool.

Mentors love the list of competences so there is a consistent training foundation and expected outcomes with the benefit of helping a mentor guide the learner leading to project success.

What makes a good program works is accountability   Somebody must monitor and measure so the job gets done.  The employee has a list of measurables, the mentor has list, then there is an independent development coordinator to meet with the learner to evaluate the measurable items and what they have successfully completed in time x and what hey plan do to in the near future.

Here is my report of the press briefing of author Chad Udell (@visaulrinse) discussing his book Shock of the New.

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Some notes:

  • The book is platform agnostic.  The tech and evaluation is important not the container.
  • The book has a 30 question rubric to help you evaluate your organization and how technology can be used by your organization.
  • Budget in Learning and Development should include money for R and D of new technology and how it can be leveraged in your organization to promote better employee engagement.
  • Organizations need build the capability of its workforce.
  • 10 years from now the workplace climate will be as different as our homes are now compared to 10 years ago.  Smart devices, connectivity and seamless knowledge access are becoming the norm not the exception in places.

Very approachable and accessible person, so I am assuming that his book is just as approachable and accessible.

Looking forward to a longer interview on T is for Training in the near future.

I have the current pleasure of attending the 2019 ATD International Conference https://atdconference.td.org/ in Washington DC for the next couple of days.

I have some cool new lightweight equipment to record some interviews (which I already have put to good use) and will be sharing some things here as well as on the feed for the show.

Highlights of today include a great presentation from Paul Signorelli, Koko Nakahara, Evert Prius and Amit Nagpal gave a presentation on Implementing Machine Learning and AI in Learning—Global Cases and Best Practices. 

Program highlights:

  • AI and Machine Learning is taking us from the construction industry in Japan, to India, to KLM Cargo in the Netherlands to URI in the United States. A truly global presentation.
  • Fail to Learn. You have to fail to learn. AI is not to replace but enhance the learning experience for the learners. AI does some stuff WITH us not as US.
  • Fact: 46% of job descriptions are obsolete. HR should move from workforce planning to WORK Planning. Need to create or be sure what work is coming in near future.
  • AI will impact ALL types of industries and learning. Even in places where the trainer never thought MY job could be in jeopardy. Change is coming.

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Also, I interviewed Paul after the program about his session and then interviewed @HalellyAzulay host of   and author of Employee Development on a Shoestring from ATD Press.    

The interviews will be on this page and on our Talkshoe page soon. 

Looking forward to more interviews and sessions tomorrow.  Follow @tisfortraining or @baldgeekinmd for my updates, or follow the twitter hashtag #ATD2019 for great content

 

Everyone brings something to their organization

If it’s ain’t you, it’s diversity. – Maurice Coleman

On the call were Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.  We decided to focus on fostering cultural competencies through training and quickly moved to talking about diversity, inclusion, as well as being culturally competent.  We told some wonderful stories to help make our points and there was even some laughter.  Give the show a listen and leave a comment with resources you want to share or thoughts on this topic.

Resources:


The blog editor (Jill) has not been using the correct show numbers for about five episodes. She finally figure that out and corrected them!

Arrow TipsSexual harassment. State law.  Diversity.  Training.

Yes, we talked about all of those topics and they ALL were related to the idea that repetition helps to accelerate learning. On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and an unnamed guest.

We began by talking about spaced repetition, from the Psychotatics article. Then we quickly moved into talking about the new requirements in New York State for yearly anti-harassment training for everyone who works in NYS (see links below).  We talked about the requirements, the form that the training takes, and more.  Along the way, we wondered if library volunteers and board of trustees should also be trained.  Near the end of the program, we touched upon diversity and bias.  It was a lively hour!  And yes, the idea of spaced repetition is throughout.

This is a slightly longer episode than normal (63 minutes); however, there are 2:35 minutes of silence (oh, Talkshoe!) in the beginning, so skip ahead.

Resources

C. Ferguson and C. Lee. (2019) Faculty of color want tenacity in diversity, inclusion programming. Daily Orange.

C. Ferguson and C. Lee. (2019) ‘Viscerally aware’: Professors of underrepresented racial, ethnic groups on how their identities impact their experiences at SU. Daily Orange.

Psychotactics. How To Accelerate Client Learning (Using Spaced Repetition)

New York State. Combating Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

New York State. Workplace Sexual Harassment Prevention 21 videos with subtitles in various languages.

New York State. Minimum Standards for Sexual Harassment Prevention Policies

 

Two arrows formed into a circleOn the call were Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman. With Maurice back, the audio was guaranteed to go well!  The conversation began with the Disciplined Pursuit of Less.  Then they talked about some questions related to helping others realize that they need to keep on learning, how to sneak it in, and how to keep our selves motivated to continue to improve ourselves.

It seems that when Maurice Coleman doesn’t host, things go badly.  There might be a very short recording, but don’t listen to it!  We couldn’t get audio to work for everyone.  Heavy sigh.  And on a day when we were supposed to be talking about making time for our own learning, we admitted that we had other things to do.  As Paul wrote:

Funny to be talking about the busy gene on a day when we were supposed to be talking about slowing things down.

So the next T is for Training will be April 12, 2 p.m. ET. We will use the video “The Disciplined Pursuit of Less” (9 min.) as fodder for our conversation.  As I (Jill) noted in email, this video hit home for several reasons. First, I am tired of saying that I’m “busy”. Second, I know that seemingly being involved in everything is impacting my ability to learn new things (some of which I really should learn). So I would like to propose three questions: (1) How do we prioritize our own learning? (2) How can we help the learners around us make continued learning a priority? (3) What strategies do we have for ‘sneaking in’ learning?

Maurice and Paul look forward to whomever can join the conversation on April 12!  Thanks to  Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Andrea Snyder, and Diane Huckabay for showing up today.

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