purple rain[Or…Training is an Art…]

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Kate Kosturski, and Jill Hurst-Wahl (all members of the “usual suspects”).  Paul proposed that we take about the Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning.  The six disciplines are:
  • Define Business Outcomes
  • Design the Complete Experience
  • Deliver for Application
  • Drive Learning Transfer
  • Deploy Performance Support
  • Document Results

One of the problems discussed was “learning scrap”, which is when training participants don’t use what they learn.  (Learning scraps are like food scraps.) We also talked about how we might assess training.

The group then talked about creativity, Prince, and making training better.  This led to a conversation on the art of training.

And somehow we ended with a free flowing conversation including an injury flow chart!

You can listen to the show here.

Resources:
  • The Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning  (read the summary)
  • Revolutionize Learning & Development: Performance and Innovation Strategy for the Information Age

InspirationToday’s topic is described as  “I hate you, now go away” or “How to engage your staff and public in lifelong learning.”  Perhaps a better title might be “inspiration time.”  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Kate Kosturski, Megan Johnson, and Jennifer Wright.

Relevant resources on this are:

2012-240 #6WordMission

Teachers are Learners

Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman started talking about the Meet the Modern Learner, which morphed into meet the modern library staff who both train/teach/learn and organize information. They then talked about how our customers have forced change by being mobile like staff, needing information on demand, open collaboration and being empowered to do so.  To listen to the show, go here.

 

Washington HiltonOn the call was Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder, Kate Kosturski and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  Both Maurice and Jill had attended the Computers in Libraries Conference last week.  Kate and Andrea are past participants. They all discussed the conference, number of participants, what has changed in the conference, what changes they would like to see, ideas about keynote speakers, and more.  The show can be heard here.

There is now a copy of the CIL 2016 Library As Podcaster presentation by Maurice Coleman (this show) and Forrest Foster of Let’s Talk Learning Spaces   Enjoy! 

3-21-16  Update:  The Talk is now up at T is for Training.  Download the podcast of the talk here 

This blog post is a summary of a session done at the Computers in Libraries Conference on March 10, 2016 by Maurice Coleman and Forrest Foster.  This post was originally published here and is republished here with permission,


Library as PodcasterForrest Foster, host of Let’s Talk Learning Spaces – he works at an academic library in North Carolina – and Maurice Coleman, host of T is for Training – he is technical trainer for Harford County Public Library.

Foster and Coleman did the session interviewing each other.
Questions asked  of each other included:
Your show is about what? Forrest started his show as a way of gathering and sharing information on learning spaces/learning commons. Maurice started his show after CIL eight years ago.  He wanted the conference experience all of the time.  He wanted an ongoing conversation on training, teaching, learning, and administration.
Who is your audience? For Forrest, it is anyone who wants to listen.  The show is marketed to academic librarians. For Maurice, his is for anyone Ina library who does training.
How do you connect with your audience?   Maurice said that people hear about the show through conferences, social media and talking to people.  Forrest asked people how we connect and said that’s what he does – email lists and social media.  Maurice noted that his shows has its own Twitter feed.
What do they (people) get out of it? For T is for Training, Maurice encourages people to show up.  People do answer questions for each other and share resources.  He provides connections to people who don’t normally connect.  For Forrest, the show provides some new information and also confirmation of their strategy.
How do you produce it? T is for Training is hosted on TalkShoe.  People use phone of Skype to call in.  Maurice doesn’t to a lot of “engineering” in the background.  Let’s Talk Learning Spaces uses BlogTalk Radio.  People can call into the show.  Generally he interviews someone.
Is there a theme or topic?  For T is for Training, Paul Signorelli frequently generates a topic, then the conversation goes on from there.  Let’s Talk Learning Spaces developed the topics based on the need of his library’s learning space.
Library as PodcasrerIs the show recorded or must you listen live?  Both!  The conversation happens live, and you can also listen to the recording afterwards.
How do you market it?  Email, Twitter, etc.
Forrest does his show at work.  Maurice does his at work or at home, depending on his schedule.  Maurice’s podcast is part of his professional development. Forrest’s show has a cost.
How did you get buy-in?  Forrest didn’t at first. He didn’t to prove return on investment.  Buy-in came with key people participating in it and the feedback he received. For Maurice, getting the then-current ALA president to call-in really helped with the buy-in.
Do you have outside funding?  Forrest, no.  Maurice said that people want to sponsor his show.  His sponsors are people he wants to promote or give him in-kind contributions.  He does not receive money from his sponsors.
The platform that Forrest uses has minimal costs.  There is no microphone or studio, since everyone calls into the show.
What challenges do you have? For Forrest, ensuring the correct resources are available when needed.  For Maurice, it is the crap-shot of who will or will not show up every other Friday for his show.
Personal impact?  Forrest – learning.  Learning about his staff and watching them grow.  A way of being active professionally.  Maurice – better speaker, presenter and trainer. He has learned to be a better person. He is better at his job.  It has been his professional development and his “advanced degree.”
What do you wish you knew when you started?  Maurice wished he knew that it was going to last this long. He wish he had lighter equipment (snowball mic), for when he takes the show on the road. Podcasts generally don’t last 8 years.
In conclusion, act locally, share globally.
Is it better to be structured or extemporaneous?  It depends on your temperament and perhaps where you work.  Consider your desired outcome.
Are either posting text transcripts or doing something for people who have hearing disabilities? Forrest has the ability to do it.  Maurice doesn’t have the capability.  Maurice notes that it would take time and time he doesn’t have.

The Show taped on March 4th 2016.  Paul Signorelli, @paulsignorelli Andrea Snyder @alsnyder02 and Maurice Coleman @baldgeekinmd  (if I let you out lmk in comments)

We used the article Learn Today; Be Prepared Tomorrow by Maria Ho from the February 2016 issue if ATD magazine to spark a discussion on what tools we use to help learners learn and how to model good behavior.

Download the podcast here.   Listen here.  

 

On the call were Maurice Coleman , Paul Signorelli, Courtney Young,Jill Hurst-Wahl and  mystery guest 5 from the Buffalo, NY area. The topic was the Padagogy Wheel.  What is the Padagogy Wheel?  According Allan Carrington:

The Padagogy Wheel was born out of a desire to help teachers at the coalface of teaching. I wanted a model that could be applied to everything from curriculum planning, development, writing learning objectives and designing student centered activities. Then quickly help teachers access relevant educational technology e.g. individual iPad apps or sequences of apps, to enhance those activities. Finally to help teachers use that technology to redefine activities to include tasks previously inconceivable. I believe this will increase student engagement, improve learning outcomes and empower a student towards transforming into an excellent graduate.

We also talked about using student use in the classroom.

You can listen to the recording here.

Resources:

8465930151_61af93058f_m_dMaurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Kate Kosturski, Angela Paterek, and Andrea Snyder talked about the just released NMC Horizon report, BYO devices, adaptive learning, augmented and virtual reality, makerspaces (since we have always been makerspaces),  and how to tell and sell our library stories to others. You can listen to the show here.

 

Pastel Bunny MarshmallowsMaurice Coleman and Jill Hurst-Wahl discussed ALA accreditation, the idea of whether there should be library trainer certification, and likely a few other random topics (like snow). You can listen to the show here.

As promised, are here is a link to the 2015 ALA Standards for the Accreditation of of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. Information on the entire accreditation process can be found in the Accreditation Process, Policies and Procedures (AP3), fourth edition.

A question for the T is for Training audience is…if someone created a certification for library trainers, so that you knew that the library training had learned “X”, what would “X” be?  Feel free to leave comments on this post OR write a blog post in your blog about this topic (and then tell us where that post resides).

 

 

 

Stairs in the ALAMW16 Exhibit HallKate Kosturski and Paul Signorelli called into the show from the ALA Midwinter Conference in Boston (MA) and tried to surprise Maurice Coleman, our show host.  The three discussed:

All about relationships and monetary return on relationship building face to face and online. Also makerspacing.

You can listen to the show here.

« Previous PageNext Page »



Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 42 other followers