Posts Tagged ‘Andrea Snyder’

The T is for Training GngOn the call were Tom Haymes (first timer), Paul Signorelli, Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.  Our topics was born out of the ShapingEDU face-to-face unconference, which occurred two weeks ago, and that had to shift online due to COVID-19.  How did they rapidly transition from onsite to online learning?

We began with talking about ShapingEDU, then shifted to talking about moving face-to-face campus classes online, and then to impact of bad Internet access.  We covered a lot of ground!

Resources:

Wow! What a lively show! On the callwere Chris DeCristofaro, Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Andrea Snyder, and Paul Signorelli.  Today’s topic was how do we do micro-training for staff around topics that we might take for granted or that are new for them?  Topics mentioned included:

  • 2020 Census
  • Pronouns
  • Gender identify
  • Gender expression

Types of training mentioned were:

  • Email blasts
  • Dedicate internal website page
  • Webinar sessions (live and recorded)
  • In-person sessions
  • Ad hoc training
  • Cooperative training between libraries and systems
  • One-on-one informal training
  • Rely champions who can lead by example

Yes, we mentioned the need – in specific circumstances – to ensure that the public library director and board of trustees are on-board.

Resources:

  • TRANS 101: Gender Diversity and Transgender Inclusivity in Libraries, Kalani Adolpho (handout)
  • (en)gender
  • Definition: They (Merriam-Webster)

 

Come Fly With Me

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T is for Training is now recording on Thursday nights and our last get together was on Oct. 10 (9 p.m. ET).  The technology spirits were not good to us (this seems to be a recent trend), but we were able to pull together a good conversation nonetheless.  On the call were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman.  We used the article “Four learning & development trends in the digital age” as our starting point.  We discussed the different ways people want to learn (see graphic below), the need for people to take charge of their own learning (self-directed learning), meeting people where they are, engaging in short bursts of training, and taking existing training and modifying into different formats.

Our next show will be Oct. 24 (Thursday) at 9 p.m. E.T. (6 p.m. P.T.)

You can listen episode 254 on the TalkShoe platform.

Resources:

Four learning & development trends in the digital age
Elementary Education Has Gone Terribly Wrong

 

Phoenix bird imageAfter an absence, T is for Training is back!  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  We talked about online learning, digital literacy, learning to learn, and learning as you go.  Our library staff need to be able to understand technology basics and then be able to learn in the moment, when necessary.  Near the end, we talked a bit about ransomware, which has been hitting some libraries in the U.S.

Maurice is suggesting that T is for Training record every two weeks on Thursday evenings at 8:30 p.m. ET.   The next one will be on Sept. 26. You can listen to this show on TalkShoe.

Resources

The library training, teaching, learning podcast is back in your ear holes. 

Come join the fun TONIGHT at 8:30 pm Eastern on our platform Talkshoe.

T is for Training on Talkshoe.

Think of it as the first day back at school, with new clothes and old friends.

See you then!

The Dizzy Pig Donut from Glazed and Confused in Syracuse, NYAndrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman started with a list of great ideas to nurture those members of a highly successful organization from the book The Dysfunctional Library: Challenges and Solutions to Workplace Relationships. They then pivoted to talk about accessible self and organizational development.  Along the way, they dropped in tips (listen to the podcast for them) and content recommendations.

Books, Blogs and Other Materials Mentioned

By the way, Friday, June 7, National Donut Day!  We hope you celebrated appropriately!

 

 

Arrow TipsSexual harassment. State law.  Diversity.  Training.

Yes, we talked about all of those topics and they ALL were related to the idea that repetition helps to accelerate learning. On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and an unnamed guest.

We began by talking about spaced repetition, from the Psychotatics article. Then we quickly moved into talking about the new requirements in New York State for yearly anti-harassment training for everyone who works in NYS (see links below).  We talked about the requirements, the form that the training takes, and more.  Along the way, we wondered if library volunteers and board of trustees should also be trained.  Near the end of the program, we touched upon diversity and bias.  It was a lively hour!  And yes, the idea of spaced repetition is throughout.

This is a slightly longer episode than normal (63 minutes); however, there are 2:35 minutes of silence (oh, Talkshoe!) in the beginning, so skip ahead.

Resources

C. Ferguson and C. Lee. (2019) Faculty of color want tenacity in diversity, inclusion programming. Daily Orange.

C. Ferguson and C. Lee. (2019) ‘Viscerally aware’: Professors of underrepresented racial, ethnic groups on how their identities impact their experiences at SU. Daily Orange.

Psychotactics. How To Accelerate Client Learning (Using Spaced Repetition)

New York State. Combating Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

New York State. Workplace Sexual Harassment Prevention 21 videos with subtitles in various languages.

New York State. Minimum Standards for Sexual Harassment Prevention Policies

 

Two arrows formed into a circleOn the call were Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman. With Maurice back, the audio was guaranteed to go well!  The conversation began with the Disciplined Pursuit of Less.  Then they talked about some questions related to helping others realize that they need to keep on learning, how to sneak it in, and how to keep our selves motivated to continue to improve ourselves.

Dictionary entry for learning by Nick Youngson, CC BY-SA 3.0On the show today were Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman, who discussed a recent article by Terry Heick for TeachThought, entitled “44 Alternatives to ‘What’d You Learn in School Today?‘”

Among the items discussed were:

  • What sort of things we do to follow-up with unsatisfied learners.
  • Ways we ask questions that engage learners as co-conspirators in the learning process.
  • Difficult questions we can ask at the end of a session to gauge where we were successful and where we could have been better as learning facilitators.
  • Questions we can ask that inspire learners to apply what they have learned during the time they spend with us.

You can listen to the entire episode on TalkShoe.  Our next show will be on March 1, 2 p.m. ET. All are welcome to join in.  Details for doing do are on the T is for Training website.

effective-learning-feedbackThis week we circled back to the article, 20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning. We began by talking about #4, which gives us these for questions to ask:

  • What can the student do?
  • What can’t the student do?
  • How does the student’s work compare with that of others?
  • How can the student do better?

Then moved into ways of providing feedback and the role of feedback.  Near the end, we talked about focusing on the person receiving the feedback and what impact we want it to have.

On the call this week were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.

Resources:

Rogers, Jenica. (2019) Define a “Natural.”

Reynolds, Laura. (2018) 20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning.