Posts Tagged ‘Andrea Snyder’

mmm…T is for Training number 213 on Friday the 13th!  On the call were Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, and Andrea Snyder.  The gang talked talked about George Couros’ (@gcouros)  eight characteristics of the innovator’s mindset and riffs off of that  theme, which included TTWWADI (That’s The Way We’ve Always Done It).  By the way, TTWWDI is usually not a good answer.

8-characteristics-of-the-innovators-mindset

Resources:

 

Advertisements
View through the windshield

Jill’s TIFT view

On the call today were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.   We talked about:

Resources for today’s show:

This was the 9th anniversary of T is for Training! Episode 1 was on September 12, 2008.  We would like YOU to help us celebrate our longevity by contributing reviews of this podcast to iTunes (one of the places this podcast is published).  Leaving a review in iTunes is not as easy as living a review on some other web sites, but it would mean a lot if you would do it.  This site has information (with photos) on how to leave a review.  As Maurice said, be honest. We’re trainers and appreciate feedback, no matter what it is.  Thank you!

Classroom.

Outdoor classroom

On the call were Jodie Borgerding, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, and Mark (high school librarian in Calgary, Canada).  On this show, we talked about the course development work Jill has been doing and what she has learned from it.  Along the way, we talked about live and asynchronous learning, flipped classrooms, engaging learners, and more.  We had a good conversation and a few good laughs!

Our next show will be on Sept. 15 (2 p.m. ET).  We are planning to discuss the content found on the Liberating Structures web site.  Feel free to look at the web site, then join us on the call.

Paul_at_NMC

Paul (on the right) at the New Media Consortium conference

On the call were Jodie Borgerding (new to the show!), Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman. We began by talking about library signage and the recommendation of libraries doing a yearly signage audit.  We then moved to talking about the digital face of the library.

Web sites mentioned:

You can listen to the episode through Talkshoe.

BTW Even though Paul Signorelli was not on the call, we want to toss him some “love” by sharing the photo we used.

Addendum: Jill sent Henderson County Public Library a Twitter message to tell them about their contact page and they fixed it right away!  Thanks, HCPL.

Sometimes it is worth telling someone (or an institution) what you think is obvious, because it may not actually be obvious.

OwlIn this episode, Andrea Snyder and Maurice Coleman talk about service to rural libraries, and specifically about the Ontario, Wyoming, Wayne and Livingston county (OWWL) libraries in the Finger Lakes region of New York State.

Sites mentioned in this episode include:

The next T is for Training will be in one-month on July 7. (2017).  By the way, if you’re attending the ALA Annual Conference (June 22-27), please look for Maurice there.

Spring flowersWith spring weather back again in the East, on the call were Diane Huckaby, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.   Our conversation twas on how to create training (or education) materials that could be reused by others.  The conversation was really rich and fruitful!

We talked briefly about making training materials Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant.

You can listen to this episode on TalkShoe.

CabbageAndrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl (in chat) and Maurice Coleman talked about the Computers in Libraries Conference, as well as rural librarianship (a.k.a. Andrea’s new position).  They talked about library services, staffing, programming and more.

Andrea is now at the Pioneer Library System with offices in Canandaigua, NY.  Part of the service area includes farm country, where cabbages are grown. (Hence the title of the show and photo.)

Mentioned in the show:

You can listen to this episode here.  The next show will be on April 28!  We’re skipping the 14th due to Good Friday, which is a holiday for some.

 

Jill's view while on T is for TrainingAfter a hiatus due to the November holidays, the T is for Training crew was back at it for the last show of 2016.  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  Today’s topic built upon the Association for Talent Development‘s Employee Learning Week and was “who might be a champion of learning?” We began listing job functions and organizations that are champions. We noted that learners can become self-directed champions of learning.  Along the way, we talked about the need for self-care (and referenced both Heather Plett and Episode 163).  Self-care has been a recurring theme, as has been the power of networking. While we are all outstanding networkers, we are not always outstanding in terms of self-care (something which we acknowledged we need to pay more attention to).

Along the way, Paul mentioned the book The Nudge (his last book reference for 2016) and we engaged in a bit of “poking” at each other. Ah friends!

You can hear this episode here.  Paul created a Storify of tweets about our conversation, which can be viewed here.

Our next call will be on January 6, 2017, then on Feb. 3, Feb 17 and Mar. 3.  We’re skipping Jan 20 because many of the T is for Training regulars will be at the ALA Midwinter Conference.

Happy Summer Solstice Northern HemisphereOn the call were Andrea Snyder, Kate Kosturski, Michael Porter, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman. We began with the topic:  How do we connect with our learners, whether it is a workshop or a speaking gig or webinar?  What tips or tricks do we use?

As background, Jill has been listening to a nearly two-hour interview with Seal (the singer).   At one point, Seal talks about advice he was given early in his career.  He had a hit (“Crazy“) and was on a popular music TV show in England.  A colleague told him that the performance was “good”, but that he hadn’t connected.  She said Seal would know when he had done it.

Tips mentioned were:

  • Provide some background on yourself to help build rapport.
  • Give the learners power by engaging them in the conversation.
  • Food! – In all seriousness, it helps people be comfortable and know that their needs will be met.
  • Assigned seating, so that people aren’t with their usual cliques.

How do you know that you “lost the room”?

  • Are people looking at you, every once in a while?
  • Scan the room.  Is the behavior in the room changing?
  • Is there someone who is a “canary”?  For example, someone who unconsciously will nod her/his head “yes” when the person gets it.

Reading the room is a soft-skill. Can it be taught?

It was pointed out that sometimes you have to power-through a training, even if you’ve lost the room.

Can you have someone in the audience that gives you feedback or ensures that there is engagement?

Managing the flow of the training is a soft-skill that a trainer needs to learn.  Managing the flow means the person needs to be flexible and nimble.  The person needs to know the content well and be able to alter priorities on-the-fly, if necessary.

One other soft skill is learning how to hide the butterflies (or worries).

What do you do before you present to an audience that you don’t know?

  • Take a few deep, focused breathes.
  • Close your eyes and do deep breathing.
  • Put on lip balm and hand lotion, and check your zipper.
  • Empty your pockets.  (Your pants or outfit will look better.)
  • Go to the bathroom.  If you have a lavalier mic, turn it off or take it off.
  • Take some time to yourself right before.  Center down and calm yourself.

You can listen to the show here.

IFLA WLIC2016After a three-minute episode on Sept. 2 (Too Beautiful Outside), the crew bounced back with a full Episode 193. On the call were Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckaby, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman.

Here are links to items mentioned in the show:

You can listen to the entire show here.