Posts Tagged ‘Andrea Snyder’

Dictionary entry for learning by Nick Youngson, CC BY-SA 3.0On the show today were Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman, who discussed a recent article by Terry Heick for TeachThought, entitled “44 Alternatives to ‘What’d You Learn in School Today?‘”

Among the items discussed were:

  • What sort of things we do to follow-up with unsatisfied learners.
  • Ways we ask questions that engage learners as co-conspirators in the learning process.
  • Difficult questions we can ask at the end of a session to gauge where we were successful and where we could have been better as learning facilitators.
  • Questions we can ask that inspire learners to apply what they have learned during the time they spend with us.

You can listen to the entire episode on TalkShoe.  Our next show will be on March 1, 2 p.m. ET. All are welcome to join in.  Details for doing do are on the T is for Training website.

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effective-learning-feedbackThis week we circled back to the article, 20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning. We began by talking about #4, which gives us these for questions to ask:

  • What can the student do?
  • What can’t the student do?
  • How does the student’s work compare with that of others?
  • How can the student do better?

Then moved into ways of providing feedback and the role of feedback.  Near the end, we talked about focusing on the person receiving the feedback and what impact we want it to have.

On the call this week were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.

Resources:

Rogers, Jenica. (2019) Define a “Natural.”

Reynolds, Laura. (2018) 20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning. 

 

Nametag where you can write your preferred pronouns.

First you should know that this episode starts about 5 minutes into the recording.  So fast forward to the five-minute mark.  (We’re still not used to the upgrades that TalkShoe did this year….and we’re technology people.)

On the call were Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  Maurice told us briefly about the MDLIBTECH one-day event (MD Tech Connect / #MDtechconnect2018) he had just attended at the Universities at Shady Grove.  The keynote speaker was Matthew Reidsma, who has written several articles and books, including “Algorithmic Bias in Library Discovery Systems.” This launched us into a discussion about how to eliminate bias in our training sessions. Our T is for Training started and ended on that topic (eliminate bias in our training ).  In the middle we talked about the adverse affect social media can have on use when parts of our past resurface and affect what we are doing today. The phrase “the past is the present” was used several times, as we acknowledged that who we were in the past (and what we said or did) represents who were are today.  In terms of that and in fighting bias in training sessions, we all noted that “it is really hard.”

This was an important conversation for us, because it acknowledged places where we need to be more thoughtful and where we know we will make mistakes.  You can  hear us thinking, struggling, and striving.

Our next T is for Training will be on December 21 and it will be our last for 2018.  We hope you’ll join us!


entre-ed-2018--StudentShowcase

Young entrepreneurs discussing their products at the 2018 EntreEd Forum (Pittsburgh, PA, September 2018)

With T is for Training Executive Producer/Host/Cat-Herder Maurice Coleman and Regular Suspect Extraordaire/Producer/Blog Editor Jill Hurst-Wahl away (playing hooky), Substitute Guest Host Paul Signorelli and Regular-Suspect-Extraordinare Andrea Snyder absconded with the show for an hour-long exploration of how trainer-teacher-learners can help–and are already helping–prepare others (and themselves) for our ever-changing work environment.

After a brief review of a KQED Mind/Shift blog post (“Ten Jobs That Should Be Safe From Automation”), Andrea and Paul used Jonathan Nalder’s FutureWe framework (which suggests how learners and leaders can thrive in the future) to examine a variety of challenges and potential solutions to the demands we are facing in our workplace environments. Particular attention was given, during the conversation, to a) the use of library makerspaces in learning; b) libraries as resources for those seeking skills to make them more competitive in contemporary work spaces; and c) ways to foster the entrepreneurial skills that becoming increasingly important to those wanting to thrive in our changing world of work.

Among the other resources mentioned during the conversation were:

You can listen to this episode on the TalkShoe platform or through places like iTunes.  If you haven’t done so, please leave us a review on iTunes.

Statue of Sisyphus and a rockOn the call were Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli.  We discussed Google.

After you’ve listened to this show, set your calendar for our next show on July 6, after the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans.

 

 

 

 

Cat HerdersThis week we were joined by Christie Ward, who is one of Paul’s ATD (Association for Talent Development) colleagues.  Also on the call were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  Maurice interviewed Christie about her work, her association involvement, and her thoughts about delivering keynotes.  Christie did a wonderful job talking about the difference between delivering versus facilitating.  We ended the conversation talking about artificial intelligence (IA), augmented reality (AR), and the fourth industrial revolution.

In talking about how she collects information prior to delivering a workshop or speech for a client, some of the questions she uses are:

  • What is it in your workplace environment that is helping or hindering your performance?
  • What technology in your workplace helps or hinders your performance?

In her coaching work, she often asks:

  • What do you do when you lose track of time?  This is a great question to discover someone’s passions and to understand if those passions relate to a person’s work.

At the end, Maurice reminded us that each person wants to be seen as smart, important, and significant. As trainers-teachers-speakers, part of our work is to help our participants feel that.

The entire episode is available on TalkShoe.

Resources:

Yes, we talked for 70 minutes and ended hearing that the older episodes (pre-2015) are no longer on the TalkShoe platform.  They are, however, still available through Apple iTunes.  We’ll post more information on how to get to those older episodes.

The path aheadMike Taylor, Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Andrea Snyder, Henry Mensch, Jay Turner, and Paul Signorelli. were today’s show.  This was Mike’s first T is for Training! We talked about how we apply learning after a conference, which was suggested by Paul based on a recent blog post.  We talked about a number of things, which this list of questions captures:

  • How do we synthesize what we learn at an event?
  • How do we share what we have learned? What is our sharing process?
  • How do we make connections between those that we met at one event with people at another?
  • Can you create time after the event, and before heading back to work, to synthesize your learning?
  • If you go to several conferences in a row, do you see several themes popping up over-and-over again?
  • How do we select which conferences to attend?
  • How do we let our learning breathe?

Near the end, we got reflective and very meta!  We hope you enjoying listening to this very lively episode.

Our next shows will be on May 25, then June 8. We will not have a show on June 22 due to the ALA Annual Conference.

Swamp ReflectionOn the call were Diane Huckabay, Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder and Paul Signorelli.  Their conversation used Deborah Farmer Kris’s KQED Mind/Shift article “5 Strategies to Demystify the Learning Process for Struggling Students” as a jumping off point for a conversation about “Using Our Brains to Help Our Students.”  Resources from the call are in a separate blog post.

Question: Have you rated the T is for Training podcast on whatever site or app you use to listen to it?  If not, please do it!  T is for Training is coming up on its 10th anniversary and currently we do not have enough ratings so that the ratings display.  Thanks! (Maurice announced that “Rate the Show” is this year’s T is for Training ongoing theme!)

To thrive tomorrow, today's learners will need to know how to make their own job.

What skills are now required?

Now that you’ve done that…

On the call were Jonathan Nalder (@JNXYZ) from Australia, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.  Jonathan started an organization called Future-U, which is a community where conversations about the future of education can occur.  What are the big picture skills which people will need? From Future-U:

Why do students start school with a creativity rating of 100% but finish with 12%, especially when its been identified as one of THE key future skills?

The Future-U web site talks about five literacies:

  • Creativity
  • Community
  • Thinking Skills
  • Project Delivery
  • Storytelling

The discussion was focused and lively as we talked about the five literacies, and provided good fodder for ongoing conversations on this topic.

You can hear the entire show on the TalkShoe web site, as well as through iTunes and other podcast sites.

Resources:

Believe

Believe sign, Baltimore, MD (2006)

Welcome to 2018 and the first T is for Training for the year! On the call were Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, Henry Mensch (in chat), Gina Persichini (in chat), and Maurice Coleman.  The topic of the episodes was “Community, #OneLittleWord, & Learning”, which means the conversation was far-ranging.

Random information from the show:

You can listen to this episode – and past episodes at TalkShoe, on iTunes, and other places where you get your podcasts.  And when you listen, be sure to give the show a review!