Posts Tagged ‘clark quinn’

Clark Quinn

Clark_Quinn--Millennials_Goldfish_Training_Misconceptions--book_coverThe training myths, misconceptions, and superstitions to which we subscribe are hurting us, the organizations we serve, and those served by our learners, Clark Quinn maintains throughout his wonderfully engaging new book, Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions.

Quinn’s respect for and commitment to evidence-based research, his puckish sense of humor, and his obvious commitment to setting and fostering the highest possible standards of professionalism in learning and development are on clear display throughout the book–as they were during his T is for Training conversation in Episode #230.

Highly recommended.

–A longer review of the book is available on the ATD (Association for Talent Development) Science of Learning blog.

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On the call were Maurice Coleman, Clark Quinn, and Paul Signorelli, for a discussion centered on Clark’s wonderfully stimulating new book (from ATD Press) Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions: Debunking Learning Myths and Superstitions.

Clark talked about the process of writing the book at the request of ATD Senior Community of Practice Manager Justin Brusino (and why Clark originally wanted to call the book Dr. Quinn’s Emporium of Learning Myths); described what he learned from researching and writing the book (including what we actually know about the attention span of goldfish); offered insights into a variety of the learning myths and superstitions he explored in an attempt to help us better serve those we assist through our training-teaching-learning-doing efforts; and kept us entertained and interested in applying what we are learning from his work.

The resources mentioned during the program were rich and varied, and have been documented in a separate post on this T is for Training site.

Revolutionize Learning & Development. (2014). San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons and ASTD Press

Clark Quinn 

Quinn--Revolutionize_L&D--CoverClark Quinn is certainly not the first to say he is mad as hell and to urge us to not take it anymore. But in this well-researched, highly- and finely-nuanced book, he does far more than recycle old rants. He builds upon research-based evidence to show where we continue to go wrong in talent development and, more importantly, offers suggestions for changing our course(s) to the benefit of those we serve. The real winners here are the learners we will better support by adapting Quinn’s first-rate recommendations to fit our learners’ and organizations’ needs.

–This brief review, originally written as a “shelf talker” posted in the conference bookstore at the ATD 2016 International Conference & Exposition in Denver (May 2016), is re-posted here with the permission of our ATD colleagues. A longer set of reflections is available on the “Building Creative Bridges” blog.