@TisForTraining 313: Cover Your Assets

Clark QuinnToday Jill Hurst-Wahl, Tom Haymes, Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, and Henry Mensch gathered to talk to Clark Quinn about his new book, Make It Meaningful: Taking Learning Design From Instructional to Transformational. Clark recently offered the following intro to the book on his Learnlets blog:

Learning Experience Design is, as author Clark Quinn puts it, about “the elegant integration of learning science with engagement”. While there are increasing resources available on the learning science side, the other side is somewhat neglected. Having written one of the books on the learning science side, Clark has undertaken to write the other half. The book is grounded in his early experience writing learning games, then researching cognition and engagement, and ongoing exploration and application of learning, technology, and design to creating solutions and strategies. It covers the underlying principles including surprise, story, and emotion and pulls them together to create a coherent approach. The book also covers not just the principles, but the implications for both learning elements and a design process. With concise prose and concrete examples, this book provides the framework to take your learning experience designs from instructional to transformational!
We talked about some of the myths of learning science, as well as ways of making learning meaningful. Clark focused on the emotional experience of the learners. That emotional experience helps the learning to occur. Of course, the topic of storytelling came up and its role in learning, as well as starting with the end in mind.
Clark’s book, Make It Meaningful, is available wherever you purchase your books, including Amazon (paid link) and independent booksellers.
You can listen to this episode on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcast episodes.

@TisForTraining 310: Wagner is a great stealth name

Pat WagnerTonight Pat Wagner joined us again. Pat is “closing up one tent in order to open up another.” We’re grateful that she came back to impart more wisdom. Pat was joined by Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, Diane Huckabay, and Maurice Coleman.

Pat is an educator, not a fixer. She began with a story about a situation that was presented to her which required “training.” When she looked into the situation, she found one where the management had tolerated bad behavior which training would not fix. She is pro accountability. If an organization is not willing to be accountable, it will continue to have the same problems.

Pat, in her storytelling, connected to the conversation we had started early in the show about diversity, equity, inclusion, accessibility, acceptance, and belonging. That thread of diversity ran through the entire show!

We want to thank TalkShoe for the background noise that they added in. It was like being on an old-fashioned party line, where two conversations were overlapping. Thankfully, we were all good humored about. We also played a game of telephone because Pat could not hear Maurice. Ah…technology!

Remember you can listen to T is for Training on the TalkShoe website or wherever you get your podcast episodes.

Addendum (05/08/2022): Here is a resource that Pat mentioned during our conversation: List of Learning Theories compiled by Richard Culatta.

@TisForTraining 308: It’s a General Show Title

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Tom Haymes, Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Andrea Snyder. Andrea told us about the Public Library Association Conference, which was the first large in-person conference she’d been to since February 2020.  She started with a thank-you to the Network of the National Library of Medicine, which provided funding to her. She noted that NNLM provides free health resources which libraries can use for programs.

According to Andrea, 4000-5000 people attended conference in-person (half the size of their pre-pandemic conferences) and there were also virtual program offered at the same time for those who were not at the in-person event.  PLA reported 6000 people total between in-person and virtual. Masks, etc., were required for the in-person event.

The most impactful thing Andrea got from the conference was the concept that libraries are micro colonizers.  She picked that up from Julian Gooding‘s lightning talk entitled “How to Decolonize Your Library Programs.”  Description:

The effects from hundreds of years of colonization continues to harm cultures, language, and literacy development. Using the lived experiences of Native Americans and African Americans, documentary filmmaker and adult services librarian Julian Gooding will discuss his journey to decolonize his own mind and recognize unconscious bias and microaggressions as a Black man delivering programs within BIPOC and white communities. Participants will learn to look within their own thinking and apply the strategies of restorative practice for healing and growth.

We talked about the program Andrea did with Cassie Guthrie on “Pathways to Professional Diversity Through Library Internships.”  Then we talked about internships, being a generalist, and more. We also talked about the book:

David Epstein. (2021) Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World. (paid link)

Have fun listing to the episode. There are a few laughs that you’ll enjoy as well as good info,

@TisForTraining 305 Help Me Understand the Spawn of Satan

100_0488Tonight T is for Training welcomed Casey Davis, who is the author of Digital Civics and Citizenship: An Applied Approach.  Joining Casey were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Tom Haymes, Diane Huckabay, and Jill Hurst-Wahl. The description of Casey’s book is a good introduction to this episode.  It says:

More and more individuals today are “digital natives.” They are comfortable with all of the advances in technology, using it every day. However, while they may be able to access the digital world easily does not translate into being able to successfully navigate it. Regardless of age and experience, young adults must be mindful of their digital presence in the expanding digital world. This book provides a guide for librarians, educators, counselors, and administrators to guide secondary and higher education students in successfully practicing responsible citizenship and civics in the digital world. In our world where our social credit is held increasing value, digital civics and citizenship are powerful tools, especially for students just venturing into this expansive realm.

The book is meant to be read by selecting the sections you want to focus on first. Casey described it as for just-in-time training.

Our topics included civics, citizenship, humor, identity, and transparency. Yes, we acknowledged that the word “citizen” can be used in a divisive manner, but the word in this context is as a person being a “citizen” (an inhabitant) of a specific online platform. (There was a lively chat/text conversation about this.)

You can listen to the show on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcast episodes.

Additional Resource

Andrew Tarvin. (2019) Humor That Works: The Missing Skill for Success and Happiness at Work. (Paid link)

 

@TisForTraining 304: I Have a Sidebar

On the call were Charles Joseph (a first timer), Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, Tom Haymes, and Maurice Coleman. This week we turned our attention to Maurice, who recently received his bachelor’s degree, and asked him questions about life-long learning. It was an insightful conversation about motivation, perseverance, and the options people have – or should have – after graduating high school.

Maurice ColemanBy the way, Charles pulled a “Paul” – an inside joke – by mentioning a relevant book, Ideas for Action: Relevant Theory for Radical Change by Cynthia Kaufman (paid link).

This was a conversation that needed more time, so we’ll return to it in four weeks on March 10.

You can listen to this episode on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcasts.

 

 

@TisForTraining 303: Culture Eats Strategy

Howard started by telling us the inspiration for the book and then dug into the neuroscience behind “making someone’s day.” (page 34)  Yes, science! And there is a boomerang effect and ripples. Wow!
How can we make everyone feel like a VIP? Howard gave us his VIP model (p. 127).  We need to observe what is happening around us, identify a need or opportunity, and act.
We spent the rest of the show telling stories and highlighting how people’s days have been made better.  Howard shared stories from the book. We shared stories – positive and negative – from our work lives. We even talked about how introverts can make someone’s day (chapter 6).  The conversation was interesting with lots of information, and uplifting.
You can listen to the show on TalkShoe of wherever you get your podcasts.
Resources

@TisForTraining 302: Say Yes To Say No

On this first episode of 2022, we had Jared Bendis, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  This entire episode was Jared and Jill talking about U.S. copyright and education! They provided explanations, great examples, and occasionally dug into the weeds.  It was glorious!  What is missing from the recording are the visuals of the nodding heads as Jared and Jill agreed with each other, and the looks when they got into the details. Every educator, teacher or trainer should listen to this episode. You can listen to the episode on TalkShoe or wherever you listen to your podcast episodes.

Resources: (Updated on Jan. 14, 2022)
Other Stuff:

This is from the NYS Committee on Open Government 2021 Annual Report. Amazing the places you can find copyright law mentioned!

Text from NYS Committee on Open Government 2021 Annual Report

T is for Training

@TisForTraining 286: Write Chapter One Last

Lifelong LearningTonight’s guest was Elaine Biech, who joined Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Tom Haymes, and Paul Signorelli.  Elaine is the author of the recently-released book Skills for Career Success: Maximizing Your Potential at Work (her 86th book!). She is also the author of The Art and Science of Training.  We talked about life long learning as well as her process for writing a book. Elaine said she can write a book in two weeks (by focusing only on writing the book)!

With a group of writers on the podcast, we had to ask about her process for writing a book. Elaine secludes herself when working on a book, and has other people handle email, etc.. She names the chapters, then organizes her materials. She noted that she writes chapter 1, which introduces the book, last. Elaine does not write in order.  Jumping around works for her.  This sounds simpler than what it likely is!

Elaine’s most recent book was born out of notes she has taken for 15 years, and skills, etc., that she knew worked.  (This book was her passion.) Among her notes, she amassed 51 skills that she writes about in the book.  She notes that we all need to be accountable for our own professional development. While our organizations likely have plans for us, we need to know what we want and then grow towards that. What is meaningful? What do we find inspiring?

Maurice did a really nice job interviewing Elaine and getting her to talk about skills and strategies.

By the way, ATD has done an interview with Elaine, which you might want to read.

You can listen to this episode on TalkShoe as well as on your favorite podcast platform. Our next episode will record on May 20 at 9 p.m. ET and we’ll be talking about writing and spreading the knowledge.

 

 
 

@TisForTraining 285: The Motivation is Punishment

Man with hedphones holding a phone and sitting in front of a laptopOn the call were Diane Huckabay, Maurice Coleman, Tom Haymes, and Paul Signorelli. Our topic was adult education theory and we began our focus on Malcolm Knowles.  Is andragogy truly different from pedagogy? Is adult education different than what we do (or should do) with K-16 students? We recognized that there were different traditions in this (e.g., European versus U.S.).  During our talk, we mentioned other people who have written and theorized on this.  This was a fast moving – and focused – conversation.

Since Jill edits this blog, she will mention this quote from “Various ways of understanding the concept of andragogy”:

There was a need to shape a form of education that could contribute to justice and peace and that would show that the societies in question had learnt lessons from the racial hatred and intolerance that accompanied the war. This led to rapid growth in the field of adult education after World War II.

You can listen to the episode on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcasts. Our next show will be on May 6.

Resources

@TisForTraining 282: The Funnel is Real

On the call were Alexandra (Alex) Almestica, Tom Haymes, Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Diane Huckabay, and Jill Hurst-Wahl. We began with Jill giving an overview of why she wrote five blog posts (below) on diversifying library staff. We then launched into a lively and informative conversation about diversity in the profession. We provided stories from our own lived experiences as we talked about this complex problem. We recognized the lack of data that could help us understand aspects of the problem, and why that data doesn’t exist.  In the end, we acknowledged that this is a problem that some just don’t understand. And if don’t understand it, you can’t address it.

You can listen to the show on Talkshoe and through your favorite podcast service. Our next show will be on March 25, 9 p.m. ET on Talkshoe.

The T is for Training Gang

Resources