Posts Tagged ‘Diane Huckabay’

Dictionary entry for learning by Nick Youngson, CC BY-SA 3.0On the show today were Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman, who discussed a recent article by Terry Heick for TeachThought, entitled “44 Alternatives to ‘What’d You Learn in School Today?‘”

Among the items discussed were:

  • What sort of things we do to follow-up with unsatisfied learners.
  • Ways we ask questions that engage learners as co-conspirators in the learning process.
  • Difficult questions we can ask at the end of a session to gauge where we were successful and where we could have been better as learning facilitators.
  • Questions we can ask that inspire learners to apply what they have learned during the time they spend with us.

You can listen to the entire episode on TalkShoe.  Our next show will be on March 1, 2 p.m. ET. All are welcome to join in.  Details for doing do are on the T is for Training website.

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effective-learning-feedback

[Regular Host Note:  So, there are two shows recorded, and Talkshoe in its infinite wisdom saved them both.  If you click the arrow in the Talkshoe player on the site, you can play the second “experimental” episode.  I think it is an auditory house of horrors. YMMV.  Jill, Paul and Diane deserve full medals of heroism for even trying to keep up with the multiple technical glitches that happened.]   

WELL!

We recorded a show, or so we thought.  What you will hear is a 38 second clip38 second clip from Paul Signorelli, who thought he was able to restart the recording. But NO!  (Oh, TalkShoe, your new platform needs improvements.)

And the fact that you can’t hear our conversation is a good thing.  The sound was horrible with both an echo and what sounded like “wind”.  (Thank you, TalkShoe.)

In the portion that you cannot year,  Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli discussed the article:

Laura Reynolds, “20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning,” TeachThought, 12/6/2018.

We talked primarily about giving feedback to learners. We acknowledged that when feedback is connected with a grade or a performance review, the learner may push back on it.  Diane gave the suggestion of peer feedback, and we had begun talking about how to teach learners to give feedback, when we decided that the sound was too horrid to continue.

As Paul said later, it was the best episode you will never hear!

We plan on coming back to this topic, and article, in two weeks.  We hope you’ll join us then!

 

 

Slide with textOn the call were Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Aaron Blumberg, and Maurice Coleman. We talked about the “Top 10 Learning And Development Trends For 2018.” Written in March, we decided to to reflect on whether we had experienced any of the trends this year.  The trends are:

  1. Personalization
  2. Bite-Sized Support Resources
  3. Robust Reports And Analytics
  4. Self-Paced Online Training
  5. Gamification
  6. Collaborative Online Learning Cultures
  7. Responsive Design
  8. Virtual And Augmented Reality
  9. Online Mentorship Programs
  10. Social Learning Experiences

Is there an 11th trend? Paul, proposed understanding that training/learning is both a process and an event.

We touched on all of the trends above and brought in examples from our training and work lives.  Listen to the call on the TalkShoe web site.

Our next T will be on Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 at 2 p.m. ET.

Happy New Year!

Nametag where you can write your preferred pronouns.

First you should know that this episode starts about 5 minutes into the recording.  So fast forward to the five-minute mark.  (We’re still not used to the upgrades that TalkShoe did this year….and we’re technology people.)

On the call were Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  Maurice told us briefly about the MDLIBTECH one-day event (MD Tech Connect / #MDtechconnect2018) he had just attended at the Universities at Shady Grove.  The keynote speaker was Matthew Reidsma, who has written several articles and books, including “Algorithmic Bias in Library Discovery Systems.” This launched us into a discussion about how to eliminate bias in our training sessions. Our T is for Training started and ended on that topic (eliminate bias in our training ).  In the middle we talked about the adverse affect social media can have on use when parts of our past resurface and affect what we are doing today. The phrase “the past is the present” was used several times, as we acknowledged that who we were in the past (and what we said or did) represents who were are today.  In terms of that and in fighting bias in training sessions, we all noted that “it is really hard.”

This was an important conversation for us, because it acknowledged places where we need to be more thoughtful and where we know we will make mistakes.  You can  hear us thinking, struggling, and striving.

Our next T is for Training will be on December 21 and it will be our last for 2018.  We hope you’ll join us!


A black and white cat on a book shelf.

On Nov. 9, Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckabay, and Paul Signorelli talked about the KQED article “20 Tips to Help De-escalate Interactions With Anxious or Defiant Students” and of course the conversation developed from there!

Yes, there was a guest cat on this episode!

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli and Diane Huckabay. Fodder for the show was in two articles found by Paul:

Overconfident Students, Dubious Employers

5 Keys to Better Align College Training With Workforce Needs

The schedule of T is for Trainings for the remainder of 2018 and the beginning of 2019 is:

  • November 9
  • November  23 – No show (Black Friday)
  • December 7
  • December 21 (Stay tuned because we all may be too deep into holiday prep for a show)
  • January 4, 2019
  • January 18, 2019

On the momentous call were Andrea Snyder, Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Henry Mensch, and Paul Signorelli.  This was our 10th anniversary episode, and we reflected on the topics that have stood out to us, including:

  • The use of shipping containers to create additional space for libraries.
  • The flipped classroom.
  • The personal and professional connections we have made through the show.
  • The fun personal in-person group recordings we used to do.
  • Who has been involved, including guest hosts.  We gave a special shoot out to Julie Strange, who is now a successful small business owner.
  • Maurice’s one-on-one interviews.
  • Providing critique and advice of conferences, training sessions, etc.

You can listen to this 10th anniversary episode on the TalkShoe platform or through places like iTunes.  If you haven’t done so, please leave us a review on iTunes.

Finally, Maurice is looking for guest hosts for the next two episodes (Sept. 28 and Oct. 12). If you’re interested, please contact him!  (His normal guest hosts are tied up.)

Below are a few photos from our 10 years….

T is is for Training Crew ready for lunch

CILDC FireCon

TisforTraining Live from Princeton & Pres4Lib

T is for Training

Book art at the Columbus Public Library (Ohio)On today’s call were Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  We talked about books, etc., that have helped us keep up-to-date on what is happening in our teaching-training-learning industry.

Resources:

After this listening to this show, if you know have a resource to share with us, and the rest of the T is for Training family, please leave a comment!

We’re celebrating our 10th anniversary in two weeks and hope some of our T is for Training colleagues will join us.

Little Dutch shoesOn the call were Jill Hurst-Wahl, Diane Huckabay, Laura Fothergill, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  We talked about the article “Use ‘Metaphorical Scaffolding’ to Learn the Hard Stuff,” by Charles Chu, from The Polymath Project site. We also spent time talking about how we have used metaphors in our training and then digressed into talking about the new TalkShoe interface.

A great quote from the article is:

High-level thinkers are not dark magicians — they’re smart-but-otherwise-ordinary people who’ve picked up some interesting tricks.

You can listen to the entire show on the TalkShoe platform (53 minutes).  One reason, by the way, to listen to the entire show is that you can hear a group of technical people learn and adapt to a new Internet platform on the fly.

Thinking About This Specific T is for Training (and the new TalkShoe interface)

Being forced into using new technology without training is like turning four year olds loose is a playpen.

Using new technology can be like falling asleep and waking up in a new place, and finding that everything you knew was gone and you only understood every third word of the language you heard.

Updated TalkShoe

TalkShoe, the service used to host and record the shows, has updated itself – and did this throw us for a loop!  Please take a moment and give our page a look.  Also notice that it now displays how many times T is for Training has been downloaded just from TalkShoe! Wow…you all love us!

Along with the change in look, the phone number to call into the show has changed.  It is now (605) 562-0444.  Our show ID has remained the same (24719).

And So a Reminder

You can now stream/download episodes of the show back to January 2015. To download an episode, you click on the episode, then look in the upper right corner for the three dots. From there you can either download the episode or link to the episode recording.

Episodes previous to that were lost in the great Talkshoe Server Fail of 2018.

Swamp ReflectionOn the call were Diane Huckabay, Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder and Paul Signorelli.  Their conversation used Deborah Farmer Kris’s KQED Mind/Shift article “5 Strategies to Demystify the Learning Process for Struggling Students” as a jumping off point for a conversation about “Using Our Brains to Help Our Students.”  Resources from the call are in a separate blog post.