Posts Tagged ‘Jill Hurst-Wahl’

T is for Training is now recording on Thursday nights and our last get together was on Oct. 10 (9 p.m. ET).  The technology spirits were not good to us (this seems to be a recent trend), but we were able to pull together a good conversation nonetheless.  On the call were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman.  We used the article “Four learning & development trends in the digital age” as our starting point.  We discussed the different ways people want to learn (see graphic below), the need for people to take charge of their own learning (self-directed learning), meeting people where they are, engaging in short bursts of training, and taking existing training and modifying into different formats.

Our next show will be Oct. 24 (Thursday) at 9 p.m. E.T. (6 p.m. P.T.)

You can listen episode 254 on the TalkShoe platform.

Resources:

Four learning & development trends in the digital age
Elementary Education Has Gone Terribly Wrong

 

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Phoenix bird imageAfter an absence, T is for Training is back!  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  We talked about online learning, digital literacy, learning to learn, and learning as you go.  Our library staff need to be able to understand technology basics and then be able to learn in the moment, when necessary.  Near the end, we talked a bit about ransomware, which has been hitting some libraries in the U.S.

Maurice is suggesting that T is for Training record every two weeks on Thursday evenings at 8:30 p.m. ET.   The next one will be on Sept. 26. You can listen to this show on TalkShoe.

Resources

The library training, teaching, learning podcast is back in your ear holes. 

Come join the fun TONIGHT at 8:30 pm Eastern on our platform Talkshoe.

T is for Training on Talkshoe.

Think of it as the first day back at school, with new clothes and old friends.

See you then!

Mobile made from guitars at the Washington Convention CenterMaurice Coleman and Jill Hurst-Wahl met in Talkshoe  on a Friday night at 9 p.m. ET to do a show.  Yes, we’re recording now in the evenings, although perhaps not this late (unless it works well for people).  Maurice and Jill primarily talked about the ALA Annual Conference, which was held June 21-24 in Washington, DC.  Amazingly, Jill has added dozens of library-related conferences, but this was her first full-fledged ALA conference!

We talked about specific ALA sessions, pros and cons of the conference, the exhibit hall, and some conference advice.

Given that we are now recording in the evening – and it is summer – we’re not on a new schedule yet.  Maurice intends to host a show during the week of August 12.  Watch for an announcement of when that will occur.

Resources (a.k.a. Jill’s blog posts):

 

ATD conference logoThis past week, Maurice Coleman and Paul Signorelli were both at the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exposition 2019 in Washington, DC.  With that as background, ATD2019 was the focus of today’s call.  Maurice and Paul were joined by Christie Ward, who was also at ATD2019, and Jill Hurst-Wahl, who ingested a lot of ATD content virtually.  ATD ICE was attended by approximately 10,000 people and had over 300 sessions.  Both Christie and Paul presented at the conference.

Christie began with an overview of the conference and the topics that resonated with her, and then Paul chimed in with sessions that piqued his interest. Both spoke about AI (artificial intelligence) which was the focus of several sessions. With technology changing – and an increase of AI – people need to be flexible.  Flexibility is a skill that students need to learn at a young age.

Paul noted that librarians and trainers overlap on many levels.  We are both invested in helping people acquire new knowledge and skills for the future.  There is much happening online that helps people learn, including TED Talks.  Christie quoted someone who said that TED Talks are the largest deliverer of learning.

This was a FAST moving conversation and these notes really do not do it justice. So LISTEN to the episode!

Quotes of the Day:

The pause is not a delay, it is a discipline. – Charles Fred, outgoing chair of the ATD Board

Pausing can be a sign of respect; meaning that you want to think before acting or responding.  Pausing is helpful in terms of respecting diversity and creating inclusion.

“ … That we even call these things ‘soft skills.’ How dare we. These are REAL skills.”

Word to Remember:

Agility

Resources:

Everyone brings something to their organization

If it’s ain’t you, it’s diversity. – Maurice Coleman

On the call were Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.  We decided to focus on fostering cultural competencies through training and quickly moved to talking about diversity, inclusion, as well as being culturally competent.  We told some wonderful stories to help make our points and there was even some laughter.  Give the show a listen and leave a comment with resources you want to share or thoughts on this topic.

Resources:


The blog editor (Jill) has not been using the correct show numbers for about five episodes. She finally figure that out and corrected them!

Arrow TipsSexual harassment. State law.  Diversity.  Training.

Yes, we talked about all of those topics and they ALL were related to the idea that repetition helps to accelerate learning. On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and an unnamed guest.

We began by talking about spaced repetition, from the Psychotatics article. Then we quickly moved into talking about the new requirements in New York State for yearly anti-harassment training for everyone who works in NYS (see links below).  We talked about the requirements, the form that the training takes, and more.  Along the way, we wondered if library volunteers and board of trustees should also be trained.  Near the end of the program, we touched upon diversity and bias.  It was a lively hour!  And yes, the idea of spaced repetition is throughout.

This is a slightly longer episode than normal (63 minutes); however, there are 2:35 minutes of silence (oh, Talkshoe!) in the beginning, so skip ahead.

Resources

C. Ferguson and C. Lee. (2019) Faculty of color want tenacity in diversity, inclusion programming. Daily Orange.

C. Ferguson and C. Lee. (2019) ‘Viscerally aware’: Professors of underrepresented racial, ethnic groups on how their identities impact their experiences at SU. Daily Orange.

Psychotactics. How To Accelerate Client Learning (Using Spaced Repetition)

New York State. Combating Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

New York State. Workplace Sexual Harassment Prevention 21 videos with subtitles in various languages.

New York State. Minimum Standards for Sexual Harassment Prevention Policies

 

Education and the Workforce of the FuturePaul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman talked about the ShapingEDU 2019 Unconference.  What would learning and the workplace look like in 20 years?  What do current employers need from learners in order to prove what they know?  Are people willing to do life-long learning?

We touched on Jill’s recent blog post, Libraries have a People Problem, which is related to today’s topic.

The bottom line of today’s discussion is, learning is experience and experience is learning.

effective-learning-feedbackThis week we circled back to the article, 20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning. We began by talking about #4, which gives us these for questions to ask:

  • What can the student do?
  • What can’t the student do?
  • How does the student’s work compare with that of others?
  • How can the student do better?

Then moved into ways of providing feedback and the role of feedback.  Near the end, we talked about focusing on the person receiving the feedback and what impact we want it to have.

On the call this week were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.

Resources:

Rogers, Jenica. (2019) Define a “Natural.”

Reynolds, Laura. (2018) 20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning. 

 

effective-learning-feedback

[Regular Host Note:  So, there are two shows recorded, and Talkshoe in its infinite wisdom saved them both.  If you click the arrow in the Talkshoe player on the site, you can play the second “experimental” episode.  I think it is an auditory house of horrors. YMMV.  Jill, Paul and Diane deserve full medals of heroism for even trying to keep up with the multiple technical glitches that happened.]   

WELL!

We recorded a show, or so we thought.  What you will hear is a 38 second clip38 second clip from Paul Signorelli, who thought he was able to restart the recording. But NO!  (Oh, TalkShoe, your new platform needs improvements.)

And the fact that you can’t hear our conversation is a good thing.  The sound was horrible with both an echo and what sounded like “wind”.  (Thank you, TalkShoe.)

In the portion that you cannot year,  Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli discussed the article:

Laura Reynolds, “20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning,” TeachThought, 12/6/2018.

We talked primarily about giving feedback to learners. We acknowledged that when feedback is connected with a grade or a performance review, the learner may push back on it.  Diane gave the suggestion of peer feedback, and we had begun talking about how to teach learners to give feedback, when we decided that the sound was too horrid to continue.

As Paul said later, it was the best episode you will never hear!

We plan on coming back to this topic, and article, in two weeks.  We hope you’ll join us then!