Posts Tagged ‘learning science for instructional designers’

Although there will be no recording of T is for Training this evening (brief holiday break to give Maurice Coleman, our Cat Herder in Chief a chance to spend time with family), there is quite a nice line-up for July/August 2021 on T is for Training:

Thursday, July 15, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–R. David Lankes, author of the newly-released Forged in War: How a Century of War Created Today’s Information Society, will join us for a discussion about what trainer-teacher-learners can learn from the book.

Jill Hurst-Wahl

Thursday, July 29, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–Our own Jill Hurst-Wahl, who will receive the Special Libraries Association’s John Cotton Dana lifetime-achievement recognition award in a public online ceremony August 3 and who has posted a set of reflections on her blog (“Personal Good News and Contributing to Your Profession”), will be with us for a conversation about volunteerism, professional development, and training-teaching-learning.

Thursday, August 12, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–Clark Quinn, who has been with us for some great conversations over the past few years, returns for a discussion about Learning Science for Instructional Designers: From Cognition to Application (released in April 2021).

James Richardson

Thursday, August 26, 20219 pm ET/6 pm PT–James Richardson, a Sacramento-based “writer, farmhand, Episcopal priest,” will join us for a conversation about getting from no to yes in training-teaching-learning. There is, of course, a backstory here: Jim and I worked together at The UCLA Daily Bruin a couple of lifetimes ago; we recently reconnected, and his story about how he moved from full-time work as a journalist to being a minister by learning to move “from no to yes” struck me as being a wonderful jumping off point for this episode of T is for Training. And yes, he continues to write: he has an amazing book (his second) coming out next year: “The Abolitionist’s Journal, due for release in fall 2022, is the story of his anti-slavery ancestor who used his house on the Underground Railroad, served as the white chaplain to a Black Union regiment in the Civil War, and then with his family founded a college for the freed slaves in Austin, Texas (Samuel Huston College).”

–Posted by Paul Signorelli