Posts Tagged ‘Maurice Coleman’

Image of person holding a brainIn this episode, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman began their conversation with the article “Why Struggle Is Essential for the Brain–And Our Lives” by Jo BoalerA great quote from the article is:

When I tell young learners that struggle and mistakes are the best times for our brains it is freeing. Students no longer give up on problems when they find them hard—they push through the struggle to the wonderful places on the other side. When students look at me with a puppy dog face and say: “This is hard,” I say, “That is fantastic. That feeling of ‘hard’ is the feeling of your brain developing, strengthening and growing”.

You can hear this 25-minute episode of T is for Training on the TalkShoe website and through your favorite podcasting platform.

Our next T is for Training will be on Nov. 21 at 9 p.m. ET.  All are welcome to join us through Talkshoe.

Statue of MosesToday we talked about neurodiversity. What is it? It is “the range of differences in individual brain function and behavioral traits, regarded as part of normal variation in the human population.” (Lexico)  Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli and Jill Hurst-Wahl discussed: How do we adopt our training so that neurodiverse people are included?  How do we adopt our organizations so neurodiverse people are included? The conversation went from neurodiversity to language diversity, and a few stops in-between.

Our next T is for Training will be on Nov. 7 at 9 p.m. ET.  All are welcome to join us through Talkshoe.

Resource

Temple Grandin,The world needs all kinds of minds (20 min. video)

T is for Training is now recording on Thursday nights and our last get together was on Oct. 10 (9 p.m. ET).  The technology spirits were not good to us (this seems to be a recent trend), but we were able to pull together a good conversation nonetheless.  On the call were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman.  We used the article “Four learning & development trends in the digital age” as our starting point.  We discussed the different ways people want to learn (see graphic below), the need for people to take charge of their own learning (self-directed learning), meeting people where they are, engaging in short bursts of training, and taking existing training and modifying into different formats.

Our next show will be Oct. 24 (Thursday) at 9 p.m. E.T. (6 p.m. P.T.)

You can listen episode 254 on the TalkShoe platform.

Resources:

Four learning & development trends in the digital age
Elementary Education Has Gone Terribly Wrong

 

TechnologyOn this nighttime version of T is for Training were Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman.  (Seems like some other regulars were traveling.)  Areas they said they would explore were:

  • How do we determine when to incorporate tech into our training-teaching-learning endeavors?
  • What spectacular failures have we seen/encountered?
  • How to we recover from those failures?
  • What successes have we had–and why?

This episode is 34 minutes in length.  The next T is for Training will be recorded at 9 p.m. ET on Oct. 10 (Thursday).  You can call-in by dialing 1-605-562-0444 (U.S. phone number) and using the show ID: 24719.  You can also connect through the TalkShoe website, beginning about 15 minutes before showtime, and use your computer microphone and sound (please use a headset).

Resource

“Tech Flop: When NOT to Use Technology in the Classroom” Meghan Selway, KQED Education blog, June 11, 2019

 

 

 

Phoenix bird imageAfter an absence, T is for Training is back!  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  We talked about online learning, digital literacy, learning to learn, and learning as you go.  Our library staff need to be able to understand technology basics and then be able to learn in the moment, when necessary.  Near the end, we talked a bit about ransomware, which has been hitting some libraries in the U.S.

Maurice is suggesting that T is for Training record every two weeks on Thursday evenings at 8:30 p.m. ET.   The next one will be on Sept. 26. You can listen to this show on TalkShoe.

Resources

Mobile made from guitars at the Washington Convention CenterMaurice Coleman and Jill Hurst-Wahl met in Talkshoe  on a Friday night at 9 p.m. ET to do a show.  Yes, we’re recording now in the evenings, although perhaps not this late (unless it works well for people).  Maurice and Jill primarily talked about the ALA Annual Conference, which was held June 21-24 in Washington, DC.  Amazingly, Jill has added dozens of library-related conferences, but this was her first full-fledged ALA conference!

We talked about specific ALA sessions, pros and cons of the conference, the exhibit hall, and some conference advice.

Given that we are now recording in the evening – and it is summer – we’re not on a new schedule yet.  Maurice intends to host a show during the week of August 12.  Watch for an announcement of when that will occur.

Resources (a.k.a. Jill’s blog posts):

 

The Dizzy Pig Donut from Glazed and Confused in Syracuse, NYAndrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman started with a list of great ideas to nurture those members of a highly successful organization from the book The Dysfunctional Library: Challenges and Solutions to Workplace Relationships. They then pivoted to talk about accessible self and organizational development.  Along the way, they dropped in tips (listen to the podcast for them) and content recommendations.

Books, Blogs and Other Materials Mentioned

By the way, Friday, June 7, National Donut Day!  We hope you celebrated appropriately!

 

 

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I had the pleasure of sitting down at the 2019 ATD ICE with Paul Meshanko, who is all about respect and how it is a powerful tool for success in the workplace.  Paul spoke at the conference about The Respect Effect: Reaching Beyond Tolerance to Build an Inclusive Workplace which is also the title of his book: The Respect Effect

https://www.amazon.com/Respect-Effect-Neuroleadership-Productive-Workplace/dp/0071816097/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1367956824&sr=1-3

You can download the interview HERE

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Please enjoy the interview with Paul about respect, workplace conditions and other great topics.

Paul Meshanko’s Book The Respect Effect

T is for Training can be found on twitter @tisfortraining and on the web at tisfortraining.wordpress.com

 

Interview with Ken Phillips at the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exposition from May 20th, 2019.   The interview can be downloaded HERE.

KenPhillips_headshot

Ken was gracious enough to spend a little time talking about evaluations, the PLA Method, learning analytics, predictive measurement, what most people get wrong with evaluations and his upcoming book Going from Training to Application Using Predictive Learning Analytics on evaluation backed by analytical data via a predictive model.

His website, Predictive Learning Analytics (PLA) lays out the methodology:

The mission of PLA is to provide L&D professionals with a systematic, credible and repeatable process for maximizing the value of learning and development investments by measuring, monitoring and managing the amount of scrap learning associated with those investments.

Contact him either via the Predictive Learning Analytics website or email at ken at phillipsassociates dot com

Side Note:  I sometimes have problems remembering people’s names.  Faces I know names, not so much.   Names can take a while to settle in the database.   This interview was so wonderful, I would talk about it and try to remember the name of the interview subject.  I merely said “the evaluation guru” and two different people said, oh, you mean Ken Phillips.

Here is Ken Phillips.

T is for Training can be found on twitter @tisfortraining and here on the blog tisfortraining.wordpress.com

 

 

The one thing about conferences, is that if you time it just right, you come back from a conference at night then get straight up to work the following day, with little time left for immediate reflection.

So here we are a couple of days after the end of the conference, and I am still processing the wonder things learned at the 2019 ATD International Conference and Exposition.

Here are some things I learned on Wednesday at the conference.

  • Trade Show floors always look the same.  ATD’s could be ALA’s or vice versa.
  • Author signings can be fun.  Kevin Kruse I am looking at you.
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  • The Talent Development and Learning profession is constantly changing.  ATD’s competencies for Talent Management professionals are currently being re imagined by ATD’s membership guided by a group of highly regarded talent development folks.  They presented a sneak peek at the direction of the new competencies.  I will bullet point my notes (from twitter) from the presentation with a slide or to later this week.   Below is a slide capture from the event.  20190522_143105
  • Eric Whitacre’s closing event of the conference was incredible.   He talked about how he scaled his project from one voice to thousands, his collaborations to create the virtual choir and his writing process.   There was even a live/virtual choir mashup at the end to send us soaring out of Washington.  Here is the Virtual Choir Website.
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My editing continues on the interviews.  They will be up on the T is for Training Blog over the next two weeks.