Posts Tagged ‘Maurice Coleman’

ALA Midwinter signage in DenverOn the call were Kate Kosturki, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Diane Huckaby, Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, and Samantha (Sam) Becker. We talked about winning the war on complacency in education.    We need to illuminate exemplars and expose people to different ways of engaging learners.  Can we learn from our own experiences?

As teachers, we need to help students/learners to understand how to learn better.  We can’t just teach them the subject, but how the student can learn more about it in the future.

Technology are not a meaningless set of tools.  We need to understand how to use the technology in meaningful ways to meet our goals.

All stakeholders need to come together to think about how various disciplines play together, and how learned can acquire multi-interdisciplinary skills.

Students/learners need to acquire foundational, core and specialty skills.  Sam noted that there are a broad range of foundational skills which people need. Some of this might be done through personalized learning.   Jill noted that the acquisition of those foundational, core and specialty skills might occur with technology being a means or clue.

This conversation connected to our previous conversation with Jonathan Nalder. Sam and Jonathan have worked together and she is was part of the genesis of  First on Mars.

What are some simple things we can do to help our folks get to a place where they can be successful with technology?

  • Digital literacy initiatives
  • Space for collaboration using technology
  • Space for using technology
  • Building in professional development for staff, so staff can then support technology learning

What’s the first thing you would say directly to trainer-teacher-learners to reverse that the part of learning that is passive (referred to in our conversation as the 90% piece of the pie)?  We talked about several solutions.

Question: Can we do personalization at scale?  What can we do face-to-face as well as online?

You can listen to the entire conversation on the TalkShoe website, as well as through your favorite podcast service (e.g., iTunes).  And don’t forget to rate the show, so we might get a rating that shows during our 10th year!

Resources:

 

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ASL sign for interpret

ASL sign for interpret

Our topic today was how to make our training more accessible.  It is not simple to make an event accessible for all, but it is necessary that we try.   Consider physical accessibility (or mobility concerns), language accessibility (including American Sign Language), etc. as issues (opportunities) to consider.  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli and Jill Hurst-Wahl.

Tips:

  • If there is a microphone, use it.
  • If you are working with an interpreter (sign language or non-English), try to give the person a script or notes in advance.  Also speak at a pace that is comfortable for the interpreter. (Make the interpreter part of your presentation.  That person is actually presenting with you.)
  • Be mindful of your learners and their needs.
  • Use the accessibility checker that is built into some products like Microsoft PowerPoint.
  • In a face-to-face session, make sure everyone can see you (line of sight). Be sure to keep your face towards the audience.  Some people make be trying to read your lips.
  • Ask your audience upfront : “How can I make the session better for you?”
  • Loud noises — e.g. lots of people talking at once — can be disorienting for people, who are sensitive to sound.  For someone who is blind, a room full of sound is like fog for a sighted person.
  • Check the languages that are spoken in your community.  Can you offer handouts in languages that are frequently spoken in your community?
  • In selecting colors for your presentation, be aware that some people are color-blind and may not be to distinguish the colors.

Resources:

You can listen to the episode here.  In two weeks, Samantha Adams Becker will be joining us on the show.  She does consulting, writing, and presenting on teaching and learning.

Question: Have you rated the T is for Training podcast on whatever site or app you use to listen to it?  If not, please do it!  T is for Training is coming up on its 10th anniversary and currently we do not have enough ratings so that the ratings display.  Thanks! (Maurice announced that “Rate the Show” is this year’s T is for Training ongoing theme!)

To thrive tomorrow, today's learners will need to know how to make their own job.

What skills are now required?

Now that you’ve done that…

On the call were Jonathan Nalder (@JNXYZ) from Australia, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.  Jonathan started an organization called Future-U, which is a community where conversations about the future of education can occur.  What are the big picture skills which people will need? From Future-U:

Why do students start school with a creativity rating of 100% but finish with 12%, especially when its been identified as one of THE key future skills?

The Future-U web site talks about five literacies:

  • Creativity
  • Community
  • Thinking Skills
  • Project Delivery
  • Storytelling

The discussion was focused and lively as we talked about the five literacies, and provided good fodder for ongoing conversations on this topic.

You can hear the entire show on the TalkShoe web site, as well as through iTunes and other podcast sites.

Resources:

Believe

Believe sign, Baltimore, MD (2006)

Welcome to 2018 and the first T is for Training for the year! On the call were Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, Henry Mensch (in chat), Gina Persichini (in chat), and Maurice Coleman.  The topic of the episodes was “Community, #OneLittleWord, & Learning”, which means the conversation was far-ranging.

Random information from the show:

You can listen to this episode – and past episodes at TalkShoe, on iTunes, and other places where you get your podcasts.  And when you listen, be sure to give the show a review!

This episode was SO awesome that it took TalkShoe seven days to process it and make it available! Enjoy!

Christmas tree 2010On the call were Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli.  Our topic:

Most significant developments in our training/teaching/learning communities in 2017

We talked about:

  • Blended learning (online and on-site together) -> Blended existence
  • Lack of good technology in organizations for telephone or video conference calls
  • Infrastructure limitations
  • Just in time training
  • Leaving room for innovation
  • Digital divide – both access and knowledge of what you have
  • Meeting the learner at the point of need with apps
  • Turning every learning opportunity into learning opportunities that include a flipped classroom model
  • Creating interactive webinars (live online training)
  • More acceptable of non-traditional learning models
  • Change in the wording used to describe what we do and how we do it

FYI – Information on meeting rules for NYS library board of trustees.  And the video Paul mentioned was Be More Dog.

A reminder that our next T is for Training will be on Jan. 5 and then we should be recording every two weeks throughout 2018.  (Note that sometimes there are changes in the schedule and we do try to announce them in advance.)

Lastly, give T is for Training a holiday gift by doing two things:

  1. Contribute a review of this podcast to iTunes (one of the places this podcast is published).  Leaving a review in iTunes is not as easy as living a review on some other web sites, but it would mean a lot if you would do it.  This site has information (with photos) on how to leave a review.  As Maurice said, be honest. We’re trainers and appreciate feedback, no matter what it is. (BTW right now we don’t have enough reviews so a rating displays for T on iTunes.  That is making Maurice very sad.)
  2. Contribute a review on the TalkShoe web site.  We have 11 reviews and an average rating currently of 4.64.  We know that more than 11 people listen to T is for Training and hope that some of you would contribute a review here, too.

Thank YOU!

TrainOn the call were Chris DeChristofaro, Kate Kosturski, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.  Chris is part of the Library Pros, who do a library/education podcast. {BTW the Library Pros recently interviewed Maurice on their podcast.}

We discussed LinkedIn’s Top 11 Challenges For Learning And Development In 2017: The LMS Game Plan To Succeed. The list is (we’ve focused on the ones highlighted):

  1. Having A Limited Budget
  2. Getting Employees To Make Time For Learning And Development
  3. Having A Small Learning And Development Team
  4. Demonstrating ROI
  5. Aligning To The Company’s Overall Strategy
  6. Building Employee Awareness Of Learning And Development Programs
  7. Getting Executive Buy-In
  8. Engaging Employees During Learning And Development Programs
  9. Lacking Data And Insights To Understand Which Solutions Are Effective
  10. Having Old Or Outdated Content
  11. Having Learning And Development Decentralized Within the Company

You can listen to the show here.  Our last two episode for 2017 will record on December 8 (hosted by Kate) and December 22, both at 2 p.m. ET.  Our first episode in 2018 will be on January 5 and then we’ll be recording (generally) every two weeks throughout the year.

Examples mentioned in during the show:

 

mmm…T is for Training number 213 on Friday the 13th!  On the call were Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, and Andrea Snyder.  The gang talked talked about George Couros’ (@gcouros)  eight characteristics of the innovator’s mindset and riffs off of that  theme, which included TTWWADI (That’s The Way We’ve Always Done It).  By the way, TTWWDI is usually not a good answer.

8-characteristics-of-the-innovators-mindset

Resources:

 

View through the windshield

Jill’s TIFT view

On the call today were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.   We talked about:

Resources for today’s show:

This was the 9th anniversary of T is for Training! Episode 1 was on September 12, 2008.  We would like YOU to help us celebrate our longevity by contributing reviews of this podcast to iTunes (one of the places this podcast is published).  Leaving a review in iTunes is not as easy as living a review on some other web sites, but it would mean a lot if you would do it.  This site has information (with photos) on how to leave a review.  As Maurice said, be honest. We’re trainers and appreciate feedback, no matter what it is.  Thank you!

Classroom.

Outdoor classroom

On the call were Jodie Borgerding, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, and Mark (high school librarian in Calgary, Canada).  On this show, we talked about the course development work Jill has been doing and what she has learned from it.  Along the way, we talked about live and asynchronous learning, flipped classrooms, engaging learners, and more.  We had a good conversation and a few good laughs!

Our next show will be on Sept. 15 (2 p.m. ET).  We are planning to discuss the content found on the Liberating Structures web site.  Feel free to look at the web site, then join us on the call.

After the rain

After the rain

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl and a TalkShoe wanderer named Jesse. Maurice and Jill talked about the training topics that are on our minds (e.g., minute pages, screenshots).  We ended by touching on requirements regarding student consumer information.

This was a 36 minute show.

Resources: