Posts Tagged ‘Maurice Coleman’

Phoenix bird imageAfter an absence, T is for Training is back!  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  We talked about online learning, digital literacy, learning to learn, and learning as you go.  Our library staff need to be able to understand technology basics and then be able to learn in the moment, when necessary.  Near the end, we talked a bit about ransomware, which has been hitting some libraries in the U.S.

Maurice is suggesting that T is for Training record every two weeks on Thursday evenings at 8:30 p.m. ET.   The next one will be on Sept. 26. You can listen to this show on TalkShoe.

Resources

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Mobile made from guitars at the Washington Convention CenterMaurice Coleman and Jill Hurst-Wahl met in Talkshoe  on a Friday night at 9 p.m. ET to do a show.  Yes, we’re recording now in the evenings, although perhaps not this late (unless it works well for people).  Maurice and Jill primarily talked about the ALA Annual Conference, which was held June 21-24 in Washington, DC.  Amazingly, Jill has added dozens of library-related conferences, but this was her first full-fledged ALA conference!

We talked about specific ALA sessions, pros and cons of the conference, the exhibit hall, and some conference advice.

Given that we are now recording in the evening – and it is summer – we’re not on a new schedule yet.  Maurice intends to host a show during the week of August 12.  Watch for an announcement of when that will occur.

Resources (a.k.a. Jill’s blog posts):

 

The Dizzy Pig Donut from Glazed and Confused in Syracuse, NYAndrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman started with a list of great ideas to nurture those members of a highly successful organization from the book The Dysfunctional Library: Challenges and Solutions to Workplace Relationships. They then pivoted to talk about accessible self and organizational development.  Along the way, they dropped in tips (listen to the podcast for them) and content recommendations.

Books, Blogs and Other Materials Mentioned

By the way, Friday, June 7, National Donut Day!  We hope you celebrated appropriately!

 

 

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I had the pleasure of sitting down at the 2019 ATD ICE with Paul Meshanko, who is all about respect and how it is a powerful tool for success in the workplace.  Paul spoke at the conference about The Respect Effect: Reaching Beyond Tolerance to Build an Inclusive Workplace which is also the title of his book: The Respect Effect

https://www.amazon.com/Respect-Effect-Neuroleadership-Productive-Workplace/dp/0071816097/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1367956824&sr=1-3

You can download the interview HERE

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Please enjoy the interview with Paul about respect, workplace conditions and other great topics.

Paul Meshanko’s Book The Respect Effect

T is for Training can be found on twitter @tisfortraining and on the web at tisfortraining.wordpress.com

 

Interview with Ken Phillips at the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exposition from May 20th, 2019.   The interview can be downloaded HERE.

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Ken was gracious enough to spend a little time talking about evaluations, the PLA Method, learning analytics, predictive measurement, what most people get wrong with evaluations and his upcoming book Going from Training to Application Using Predictive Learning Analytics on evaluation backed by analytical data via a predictive model.

His website, Predictive Learning Analytics (PLA) lays out the methodology:

The mission of PLA is to provide L&D professionals with a systematic, credible and repeatable process for maximizing the value of learning and development investments by measuring, monitoring and managing the amount of scrap learning associated with those investments.

Contact him either via the Predictive Learning Analytics website or email at ken at phillipsassociates dot com

Side Note:  I sometimes have problems remembering people’s names.  Faces I know names, not so much.   Names can take a while to settle in the database.   This interview was so wonderful, I would talk about it and try to remember the name of the interview subject.  I merely said “the evaluation guru” and two different people said, oh, you mean Ken Phillips.

Here is Ken Phillips.

T is for Training can be found on twitter @tisfortraining and here on the blog tisfortraining.wordpress.com

 

 

The one thing about conferences, is that if you time it just right, you come back from a conference at night then get straight up to work the following day, with little time left for immediate reflection.

So here we are a couple of days after the end of the conference, and I am still processing the wonder things learned at the 2019 ATD International Conference and Exposition.

Here are some things I learned on Wednesday at the conference.

  • Trade Show floors always look the same.  ATD’s could be ALA’s or vice versa.
  • Author signings can be fun.  Kevin Kruse I am looking at you.
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  • The Talent Development and Learning profession is constantly changing.  ATD’s competencies for Talent Management professionals are currently being re imagined by ATD’s membership guided by a group of highly regarded talent development folks.  They presented a sneak peek at the direction of the new competencies.  I will bullet point my notes (from twitter) from the presentation with a slide or to later this week.   Below is a slide capture from the event.  20190522_143105
  • Eric Whitacre’s closing event of the conference was incredible.   He talked about how he scaled his project from one voice to thousands, his collaborations to create the virtual choir and his writing process.   There was even a live/virtual choir mashup at the end to send us soaring out of Washington.  Here is the Virtual Choir Website.
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My editing continues on the interviews.  They will be up on the T is for Training Blog over the next two weeks.

 

ATD conference logoThis past week, Maurice Coleman and Paul Signorelli were both at the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exposition 2019 in Washington, DC.  With that as background, ATD2019 was the focus of today’s call.  Maurice and Paul were joined by Christie Ward, who was also at ATD2019, and Jill Hurst-Wahl, who ingested a lot of ATD content virtually.  ATD ICE was attended by approximately 10,000 people and had over 300 sessions.  Both Christie and Paul presented at the conference.

Christie began with an overview of the conference and the topics that resonated with her, and then Paul chimed in with sessions that piqued his interest. Both spoke about AI (artificial intelligence) which was the focus of several sessions. With technology changing – and an increase of AI – people need to be flexible.  Flexibility is a skill that students need to learn at a young age.

Paul noted that librarians and trainers overlap on many levels.  We are both invested in helping people acquire new knowledge and skills for the future.  There is much happening online that helps people learn, including TED Talks.  Christie quoted someone who said that TED Talks are the largest deliverer of learning.

This was a FAST moving conversation and these notes really do not do it justice. So LISTEN to the episode!

Quotes of the Day:

The pause is not a delay, it is a discipline. – Charles Fred, outgoing chair of the ATD Board

Pausing can be a sign of respect; meaning that you want to think before acting or responding.  Pausing is helpful in terms of respecting diversity and creating inclusion.

“ … That we even call these things ‘soft skills.’ How dare we. These are REAL skills.”

Word to Remember:

Agility

Resources:

Why yes, I do.

This was another inspiring day at the ATD Conference and Exposition here in Washington DC.

The day started with the annual State of the Association briefing this morning with ATD’s @tonybingham @rosevelezsmith and Charles Fred. (covered here)

After that, I wandered around the conference and found some great people to talk to about their learning, training, and talent management work. Their cleaned up interviews will be coming soon to this space.

I continue to be inspired by the passion for the work and the depth of knowledge of the good people I interviewed today. 

They were:

Finally, in the couldn’t interview them today but will try in the future category:

  • Craig C. Clayton @craigbclayton with a good chicken story;
  • Justin Brusino @atdlearntech talked about some ways to collaborate; and
  • Ryan Changcoco @atdmanagement talked about ATD’s upcoming Wayback Training Videos that should be out this summer to advertise the upcoming ATD TechKnowledge Conference in 2020.

Thanks to all the people mentioned and to all of those who provided the energy of their presence today.

If I talked to you and you didn’t make this list I apologize profusely.

Some notes from the @ATD State of the Association Conference briefing featuring @tonybingham ATD President & CEO, Charles Fred, Current ATD Board Chair and Rose Velez-Smith Board Chair-Elect.

NB: The bullet points below are a collection of the tweets sent from the press briefing this morning. All quotes are from one of the three participants. I apologize for not being able to properly attribute each quote to one of the three speakers, but I thought it was more important to capture the essence of the quick moving conversation. Thank you for understanding.

The highlights: 

  • State of the Association This looks like one of the largest ATD conferenceATD conferences ever.
  • Different membership levels to reflect greater diversity in learning roles in organizations
  • you want to hang onto the things that work but keep an eye on the new to move the association forward.
  • The association focus is aligned with c level concerns about talent recruitment and retention.
  • CPLP certification is an international certification mindful of the cultural similarities and uniqueness of different markets.
  • We need to make sure that there is a culture of continual learning (like libraries!) that will help all talent adapt to future changes.
  • Learning is not something is done to you. How do we get individuals to get proactive about learning and receptive to learning.
  • Shift of organizations into learning organizations. (Libraries have been doing this for decades MD has learning libraries method of organizational thinking.)
  • People come to ATD for career development. The Association has to continue to provide resources that support that goal here at the conference.
  • How do the people that influence the business the most get a seat at the table? How do you draw others to the table?
  • ATD worked for years to get @Oprah to come to ATD. Demonstrates persistence, generosity, low ego and relatability. And she is one of the most influential people in the world. How do you NOT learn from her.
  • ATD continues to create new channels of content with a new person at the association and taking a look at the content segmentation structure and see how we can drive more people to more relevant to them content.
  • ATD is taking a deep dive into the UX and ATD’s current content organization. They have hired someone at the association that will focus on this specific area of member support.
  • Was the increase in conference attendance this year and last year because of the speakers?… Pres. Obama and Oprah Having them speak at ATD put the stamp of approval to the conference to those who don’t know about ATD
  • ATD continues to protect organization neutrality even though a few thought that Pres Obama and Oprah were more political choices not leadership choices for speakers.
  • ATD continues to work on increasing the international representation at the highest levels of the association. Being mindful of the logistics, how to keep the international perspective on the association’s radar.

Paul Smith (@paulsmithatd) discusses his new book Learning While Working which focuses on successful training while in a particular position.   I was lucky enough to hear his briefing and record an interview with him.  That interview is coming up soon on this same @tisfortraining station.

Paul Smith

NB — This is an edited stream of consciousness note taking.  This only scratches the surface of the book.

Many places treat OTJ (On The Job) training as an episode of survivor, sink or swim.

Organizations should treat OTJ training just like regular structured training.  It should have consistent goals and outcomes just like a successful n or outside of the traditional classroom setting.

Known objectives work to keep younger learners engaged.  Keep them in the drivers seat with upfront objectives shared at beginning of job cycle.

Good SOTJ (Structured On The Job) training program builds on a specific job role not the whole company. if there is just a sink or swim training mentality, the good people leave after four years.

Best to have specific tasks not just general Know excel but know how to x in excel.

There are two things that all good SOTJ training programs have:

Number One:

Sit down with specific role and identify specific and measurable things to be considered competent.  Doesn’t matter the size of the job.  Both learner and organization must know specific tasks to ensure learner success.  This list is a living document, not set in stone for eternity.

Must be specific measurable competencies in a position.

It can be a painful but beneficial journey to make organization position skills consistent throughout an organization leaving room for customization and local enhancement.

Once you do that you go to Two which is:

How do you know that they are competent?   Must evaluate observable output so someone else can evaluate position competence.

Don’t think of On The Job Training as that but think of a  competency based training.  While there is a place in the workplace for classroom training, job specific training is different from the information dissemination class training experience.

OTJ should be competency based learning to help you the worker establish a sense of competence in what you need to know to successfully do you job.   Use the measurable items to determine success of training and program.

You can use a competency based learning program that is completely  organized and viewed up front can be used as a recruitment tool.

Mentors love the list of competences so there is a consistent training foundation and expected outcomes with the benefit of helping a mentor guide the learner leading to project success.

What makes a good program works is accountability   Somebody must monitor and measure so the job gets done.  The employee has a list of measurables, the mentor has list, then there is an independent development coordinator to meet with the learner to evaluate the measurable items and what they have successfully completed in time x and what hey plan do to in the near future.