Posts Tagged ‘Maurice Coleman’

The T is for Training GngOn the call were Tom Haymes (first timer), Paul Signorelli, Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.  Our topics was born out of the ShapingEDU face-to-face unconference, which occurred two weeks ago, and that had to shift online due to COVID-19.  How did they rapidly transition from onsite to online learning?

We began with talking about ShapingEDU, then shifted to talking about moving face-to-face campus classes online, and then to impact of bad Internet access.  We covered a lot of ground!

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How to wash your handsOn the call were Chris DeChristofaro, Maurice Coleman, and Jill Hurst-Wahl. We talked about the topic that is on everyone’s mind – COVID-19 – and focused on the things our libraries need to be thinking about. And in the middle of the episode, Chris learned that his library will be closed tomorrow because of the virus. Yes, this “cow dung” is real!

As we talked, we mentioned these tips (and likely a few more):

  • Wash your hands a lot!
  • Keep equipment and surfaces clean.
  • Understand how to communicate with your staff.  Have good lines of communication (email, robocalls, etc.).
  • Have a “what do we do if” plan for your staff.
  • Provide staff resources (e.g., tech, access, files, etc.), in case staff have to work from home.  Do people need secure access?
  • Monitor your Internet and check that it is handling increased traffic.
  • Consider limiting tech access, if you need to accommodate more people.
  • Try to understand the impact of businesses and schools closing on your services and usage.
  • Have access to verifiable information and share that information with others.
  • Create COVID-19 resources for your community on the library web site.

These are serious times. Please be safe and join us in two weeks (March 26) for our next episode.

Resources

NODTonight was a continuation of episode 260. We used written comments from Diane Huckabay, which she submitted for that episode, to fuel the conversation. From her email, we picked up on diversity, security, privacy, and ignorance. On the call were Chris DeChristofaro, Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.   You can listen to the episode on TalkShoe and through your favorite podcast service.

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Innovation Studio rulesPaul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman talked about an innovator’s mindset in teaching, learning and training.

Paul graciously wrote a review of the book on which this episode is based.  Listen to the episode, read the review…read the other review he points to…then come back in two weeks for the next T is for Training on Feb. 27, 9 p.m. ET.

 

Wow! What a lively show! On the callwere Chris DeCristofaro, Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Andrea Snyder, and Paul Signorelli.  Today’s topic was how do we do micro-training for staff around topics that we might take for granted or that are new for them?  Topics mentioned included:

  • 2020 Census
  • Pronouns
  • Gender identify
  • Gender expression

Types of training mentioned were:

  • Email blasts
  • Dedicate internal website page
  • Webinar sessions (live and recorded)
  • In-person sessions
  • Ad hoc training
  • Cooperative training between libraries and systems
  • One-on-one informal training
  • Rely champions who can lead by example

Yes, we mentioned the need – in specific circumstances – to ensure that the public library director and board of trustees are on-board.

Resources:

  • TRANS 101: Gender Diversity and Transgender Inclusivity in Libraries, Kalani Adolpho (handout)
  • (en)gender
  • Definition: They (Merriam-Webster)

 

Come Fly With Me

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Botanic GardenOn the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, and Jill Hurst-Wahl. Our conversation on training trends we’d like to see went immediately to cultural competencies.  What is cultural competence?  According to a quote on the Washington State University website:

A set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. Competence, in particular, implies having the capacity to function effectively as an individual and an organization within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by [participants] in their communities. (Adapted from Cross, Bazron, Dennis, & Isaacs, 1989).

And from Emporia State:

Cultural competency provides an effective avenue in closing the disparities gap between communities. It’s the way people can come together and talk about concerns without cultural differences hindering the conversation, but enhancing it. Quite simply, programs and services that are respectful of and responsive to the cultural beliefs, practices and norms of diverse individuals can help bring about positive outcomes.

You can listen to the show on your favorite podcast place and through TalkShoe,  The next show is scheduled for Jan. 30 at 9 p.m. ET.

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Started up my Bullet Journal at work today - loving the Bullet Journal book @rydercarroll sent for me to test out. @leuchtturm1917 books are pretty great!Tonight we had Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Diane Huckabay (in chat), and Maurice Coleman to talk about the changes that occurred this year.  Maurice started us with an article we had referenced during on Jan. 4, 2019 episode (Top 7 Tips) and we took off from there! From Bullet Journaling to the demise of the Super Shuttle to augmented reality to forced tech upgrades, we covered a lot of ground!

You can listen to this episode on TalkShoe and wherever you get your podcasts.

In 2020, we may record an episode on January 2, if we’ve survived New Year’s.  Otherwise, we will record on January 16 at 9 p.m. ET.

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Image of person holding a brainIn this episode, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman began their conversation with the article “Why Struggle Is Essential for the Brain–And Our Lives” by Jo BoalerA great quote from the article is:

When I tell young learners that struggle and mistakes are the best times for our brains it is freeing. Students no longer give up on problems when they find them hard—they push through the struggle to the wonderful places on the other side. When students look at me with a puppy dog face and say: “This is hard,” I say, “That is fantastic. That feeling of ‘hard’ is the feeling of your brain developing, strengthening and growing”.

You can hear this 25-minute episode of T is for Training on the TalkShoe website and through your favorite podcasting platform.

Our next T is for Training will be on Nov. 21 at 9 p.m. ET.  All are welcome to join us through Talkshoe.

Statue of MosesToday we talked about neurodiversity. What is it? It is “the range of differences in individual brain function and behavioral traits, regarded as part of normal variation in the human population.” (Lexico)  Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli and Jill Hurst-Wahl discussed: How do we adopt our training so that neurodiverse people are included?  How do we adopt our organizations so neurodiverse people are included? The conversation went from neurodiversity to language diversity, and a few stops in-between.

Our next T is for Training will be on Nov. 7 at 9 p.m. ET.  All are welcome to join us through Talkshoe.

Resource

Temple Grandin,The world needs all kinds of minds (20 min. video)

T is for Training is now recording on Thursday nights and our last get together was on Oct. 10 (9 p.m. ET).  The technology spirits were not good to us (this seems to be a recent trend), but we were able to pull together a good conversation nonetheless.  On the call were Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman.  We used the article “Four learning & development trends in the digital age” as our starting point.  We discussed the different ways people want to learn (see graphic below), the need for people to take charge of their own learning (self-directed learning), meeting people where they are, engaging in short bursts of training, and taking existing training and modifying into different formats.

Our next show will be Oct. 24 (Thursday) at 9 p.m. E.T. (6 p.m. P.T.)

You can listen episode 254 on the TalkShoe platform.

Resources:

Four learning & development trends in the digital age
Elementary Education Has Gone Terribly Wrong