Posts Tagged ‘Paul Signorelli’

The Dizzy Pig Donut from Glazed and Confused in Syracuse, NYAndrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman started with a list of great ideas to nurture those members of a highly successful organization from the book The Dysfunctional Library: Challenges and Solutions to Workplace Relationships. They then pivoted to talk about accessible self and organizational development.  Along the way, they dropped in tips (listen to the podcast for them) and content recommendations.

Books, Blogs and Other Materials Mentioned

By the way, Friday, June 7, National Donut Day!  We hope you celebrated appropriately!

 

 

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ATD conference logoThis past week, Maurice Coleman and Paul Signorelli were both at the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exposition 2019 in Washington, DC.  With that as background, ATD2019 was the focus of today’s call.  Maurice and Paul were joined by Christie Ward, who was also at ATD2019, and Jill Hurst-Wahl, who ingested a lot of ATD content virtually.  ATD ICE was attended by approximately 10,000 people and had over 300 sessions.  Both Christie and Paul presented at the conference.

Christie began with an overview of the conference and the topics that resonated with her, and then Paul chimed in with sessions that piqued his interest. Both spoke about AI (artificial intelligence) which was the focus of several sessions. With technology changing – and an increase of AI – people need to be flexible.  Flexibility is a skill that students need to learn at a young age.

Paul noted that librarians and trainers overlap on many levels.  We are both invested in helping people acquire new knowledge and skills for the future.  There is much happening online that helps people learn, including TED Talks.  Christie quoted someone who said that TED Talks are the largest deliverer of learning.

This was a FAST moving conversation and these notes really do not do it justice. So LISTEN to the episode!

Quotes of the Day:

The pause is not a delay, it is a discipline. – Charles Fred, outgoing chair of the ATD Board

Pausing can be a sign of respect; meaning that you want to think before acting or responding.  Pausing is helpful in terms of respecting diversity and creating inclusion.

“ … That we even call these things ‘soft skills.’ How dare we. These are REAL skills.”

Word to Remember:

Agility

Resources:

So today at #ATD2019 for the show was awesome. Here goes the bullet points of my day:

Sat in on the Chad Udell @visualrinse presser about his book  Shock of the New. Hope to have him on the show to talk about his work including how you can use his 30 question rubric to help you evaluate your organization and how technology can be used by your organization.

Sat in on the Paul Smith (@paulsmithatd) discusses his new book Learning While Working which focuses on successful training while in a particular position.   His interview will be coming up on the show soon.

After lunch and some time in a session by Bob Pike (@bobpikectt) where he trained some trainers. And did so with style and humor. Paul Signorelli @trainersleaders has the notes about that session and a session with Jamie Millard/Frank Satterwaite authors of the book Becoming a Can-Do Leader. If we are lucky we will get them on an upcoming episode of the podcast.

Then a string of great serendipitous interviews with:

  • Paul Meshanko (@paulmeshanko) about the keys to respect. An organization were the employees respect each other is a more productive workplace with an engaged workforce not focused on their limbic brain. That two part interview will be up soon.
  • Ken Phillips (site to come) talked about evaluation and how to build a strong evaluation tool and his work on the 12 questions to effectively evaluate the transfer of learning. He taught me that what I don’t know about evaluation would fill several volumes. Two parts up soon.
  • Dr. Chan Lee (@hrdream) from Seoul National University talked about AI and that AI won’t take away jobs but allow job restructuring to free workers from mundane tasks.
  • Dr. Claretha Hughes and I talked about the intersection of talent management and technology and how companies can keep their people if they treat them like technology. Her most recent book is called Workforce Inter-Personnel Diversity: The Power to Influence Human Productivity and Career Development.

I was truly lucky to meet such a group of smart and engaged people today. I do need to clean up some sound, including two different breaks for convention center unexpected furniture movement.

We will be talking about some of these subjects on the next episode of T is for Training this Friday at 2pm ET.

I have the current pleasure of attending the 2019 ATD International Conference https://atdconference.td.org/ in Washington DC for the next couple of days.

I have some cool new lightweight equipment to record some interviews (which I already have put to good use) and will be sharing some things here as well as on the feed for the show.

Highlights of today include a great presentation from Paul Signorelli, Koko Nakahara, Evert Prius and Amit Nagpal gave a presentation on Implementing Machine Learning and AI in Learning—Global Cases and Best Practices. 

Program highlights:

  • AI and Machine Learning is taking us from the construction industry in Japan, to India, to KLM Cargo in the Netherlands to URI in the United States. A truly global presentation.
  • Fail to Learn. You have to fail to learn. AI is not to replace but enhance the learning experience for the learners. AI does some stuff WITH us not as US.
  • Fact: 46% of job descriptions are obsolete. HR should move from workforce planning to WORK Planning. Need to create or be sure what work is coming in near future.
  • AI will impact ALL types of industries and learning. Even in places where the trainer never thought MY job could be in jeopardy. Change is coming.

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Also, I interviewed Paul after the program about his session and then interviewed @HalellyAzulay host of   and author of Employee Development on a Shoestring from ATD Press.    

The interviews will be on this page and on our Talkshoe page soon. 

Looking forward to more interviews and sessions tomorrow.  Follow @tisfortraining or @baldgeekinmd for my updates, or follow the twitter hashtag #ATD2019 for great content

 

Everyone brings something to their organization

If it’s ain’t you, it’s diversity. – Maurice Coleman

On the call were Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.  We decided to focus on fostering cultural competencies through training and quickly moved to talking about diversity, inclusion, as well as being culturally competent.  We told some wonderful stories to help make our points and there was even some laughter.  Give the show a listen and leave a comment with resources you want to share or thoughts on this topic.

Resources:


The blog editor (Jill) has not been using the correct show numbers for about five episodes. She finally figure that out and corrected them!

Arrow TipsSexual harassment. State law.  Diversity.  Training.

Yes, we talked about all of those topics and they ALL were related to the idea that repetition helps to accelerate learning. On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and an unnamed guest.

We began by talking about spaced repetition, from the Psychotatics article. Then we quickly moved into talking about the new requirements in New York State for yearly anti-harassment training for everyone who works in NYS (see links below).  We talked about the requirements, the form that the training takes, and more.  Along the way, we wondered if library volunteers and board of trustees should also be trained.  Near the end of the program, we touched upon diversity and bias.  It was a lively hour!  And yes, the idea of spaced repetition is throughout.

This is a slightly longer episode than normal (63 minutes); however, there are 2:35 minutes of silence (oh, Talkshoe!) in the beginning, so skip ahead.

Resources

C. Ferguson and C. Lee. (2019) Faculty of color want tenacity in diversity, inclusion programming. Daily Orange.

C. Ferguson and C. Lee. (2019) ‘Viscerally aware’: Professors of underrepresented racial, ethnic groups on how their identities impact their experiences at SU. Daily Orange.

Psychotactics. How To Accelerate Client Learning (Using Spaced Repetition)

New York State. Combating Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

New York State. Workplace Sexual Harassment Prevention 21 videos with subtitles in various languages.

New York State. Minimum Standards for Sexual Harassment Prevention Policies

 

Two arrows formed into a circleOn the call were Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman. With Maurice back, the audio was guaranteed to go well!  The conversation began with the Disciplined Pursuit of Less.  Then they talked about some questions related to helping others realize that they need to keep on learning, how to sneak it in, and how to keep our selves motivated to continue to improve ourselves.

Education and the Workforce of the FuturePaul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman talked about the ShapingEDU 2019 Unconference.  What would learning and the workplace look like in 20 years?  What do current employers need from learners in order to prove what they know?  Are people willing to do life-long learning?

We touched on Jill’s recent blog post, Libraries have a People Problem, which is related to today’s topic.

The bottom line of today’s discussion is, learning is experience and experience is learning.

On the call were Diane Hackabay, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman. Paul had proposed that the crew explore explore the changing nature of our onsite-online (blended) learning spaces today–and the tech tools that support/encourage the changing nature of those blended spaces.  But where did the conversation meander? Paul provided this blog post to kick off the conversation.

Dictionary entry for learning by Nick Youngson, CC BY-SA 3.0On the show today were Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman, who discussed a recent article by Terry Heick for TeachThought, entitled “44 Alternatives to ‘What’d You Learn in School Today?‘”

Among the items discussed were:

  • What sort of things we do to follow-up with unsatisfied learners.
  • Ways we ask questions that engage learners as co-conspirators in the learning process.
  • Difficult questions we can ask at the end of a session to gauge where we were successful and where we could have been better as learning facilitators.
  • Questions we can ask that inspire learners to apply what they have learned during the time they spend with us.

You can listen to the entire episode on TalkShoe.  Our next show will be on March 1, 2 p.m. ET. All are welcome to join in.  Details for doing do are on the T is for Training website.