Posts Tagged ‘Paul Signorelli’

effective-learning-feedbackWELL!

We recorded a show, or so we thought.  What you will hear is a 38 second clip38 second clip from Paul Signorelli, who thought he was able to restart the recording. But NO!  (Oh, TalkShoe, your new platform needs improvements.)

And the fact that you can’t hear our conversation is a good thing.  The sound was horrible with both an echo and what sounded like “wind”.  (Thank you, TalkShoe.)

In the portion that you cannot year,  Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli discussed the article:

Laura Reynolds, “20 Ways to Provide Effective Feedback for Learning,” TeachThought, 12/6/2018.

We talked primarily about giving feedback to learners. We acknowledged that when feedback is connected with a grade or a performance review, the learner may push back on it.  Diane gave the suggestion of peer feedback, and we had begun talking about how to teach learners to give feedback, when we decided that the sound was too horrid to continue.

As Paul said later, it was the best episode you will never hear!

We plan on coming back to this topic, and article, in two weeks.  We hope you’ll join us then!

 

 

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New Year goals 2019On the first show of 2019 were Aaron Blumberg, Maurice Coleman, and Paul Signorelli. The show occasionally attracts a distruptor, whose behavior got the person kicked off the call.  New people are always welcome, but people who just want to be disruptive are not.

Today’s topic grow out of an article written by Paloma Cantero-Gomez, in Forbes, entitled Make Use of These Top 7 tips to Achieve Your Goals in 2019.”  We focus heavily on goals at the start of the new calendar year, but what we need to do to achieve our goals are activities which occur every day.  Those activities include, for example, deciding at the end of a training session what we need to do next.

Additional Resources:

Slide with textOn the call were Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Aaron Blumberg, and Maurice Coleman. We talked about the “Top 10 Learning And Development Trends For 2018.” Written in March, we decided to to reflect on whether we had experienced any of the trends this year.  The trends are:

  1. Personalization
  2. Bite-Sized Support Resources
  3. Robust Reports And Analytics
  4. Self-Paced Online Training
  5. Gamification
  6. Collaborative Online Learning Cultures
  7. Responsive Design
  8. Virtual And Augmented Reality
  9. Online Mentorship Programs
  10. Social Learning Experiences

Is there an 11th trend? Paul, proposed understanding that training/learning is both a process and an event.

We touched on all of the trends above and brought in examples from our training and work lives.  Listen to the call on the TalkShoe web site.

Our next T will be on Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 at 2 p.m. ET.

Happy New Year!

Nametag where you can write your preferred pronouns.

First you should know that this episode starts about 5 minutes into the recording.  So fast forward to the five-minute mark.  (We’re still not used to the upgrades that TalkShoe did this year….and we’re technology people.)

On the call were Diane Huckabay, Andrea Snyder, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  Maurice told us briefly about the MDLIBTECH one-day event (MD Tech Connect / #MDtechconnect2018) he had just attended at the Universities at Shady Grove.  The keynote speaker was Matthew Reidsma, who has written several articles and books, including “Algorithmic Bias in Library Discovery Systems.” This launched us into a discussion about how to eliminate bias in our training sessions. Our T is for Training started and ended on that topic (eliminate bias in our training ).  In the middle we talked about the adverse affect social media can have on use when parts of our past resurface and affect what we are doing today. The phrase “the past is the present” was used several times, as we acknowledged that who we were in the past (and what we said or did) represents who were are today.  In terms of that and in fighting bias in training sessions, we all noted that “it is really hard.”

This was an important conversation for us, because it acknowledged places where we need to be more thoughtful and where we know we will make mistakes.  You can  hear us thinking, struggling, and striving.

Our next T is for Training will be on December 21 and it will be our last for 2018.  We hope you’ll join us!


A black and white cat on a book shelf.

On Nov. 9, Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckabay, and Paul Signorelli talked about the KQED article “20 Tips to Help De-escalate Interactions With Anxious or Defiant Students” and of course the conversation developed from there!

Yes, there was a guest cat on this episode!

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli and Diane Huckabay. Fodder for the show was in two articles found by Paul:

Overconfident Students, Dubious Employers

5 Keys to Better Align College Training With Workforce Needs

The schedule of T is for Trainings for the remainder of 2018 and the beginning of 2019 is:

  • November 9
  • November  23 – No show (Black Friday)
  • December 7
  • December 21 (Stay tuned because we all may be too deep into holiday prep for a show)
  • January 4, 2019
  • January 18, 2019

entre-ed-2018--StudentShowcase

Young entrepreneurs discussing their products at the 2018 EntreEd Forum (Pittsburgh, PA, September 2018)

With T is for Training Executive Producer/Host/Cat-Herder Maurice Coleman and Regular Suspect Extraordaire/Producer/Blog Editor Jill Hurst-Wahl away (playing hooky), Substitute Guest Host Paul Signorelli and Regular-Suspect-Extraordinare Andrea Snyder absconded with the show for an hour-long exploration of how trainer-teacher-learners can help–and are already helping–prepare others (and themselves) for our ever-changing work environment.

After a brief review of a KQED Mind/Shift blog post (“Ten Jobs That Should Be Safe From Automation”), Andrea and Paul used Jonathan Nalder’s FutureWe framework (which suggests how learners and leaders can thrive in the future) to examine a variety of challenges and potential solutions to the demands we are facing in our workplace environments. Particular attention was given, during the conversation, to a) the use of library makerspaces in learning; b) libraries as resources for those seeking skills to make them more competitive in contemporary work spaces; and c) ways to foster the entrepreneurial skills that becoming increasingly important to those wanting to thrive in our changing world of work.

Among the other resources mentioned during the conversation were:

You can listen to this episode on the TalkShoe platform or through places like iTunes.  If you haven’t done so, please leave us a review on iTunes.

On the momentous call were Andrea Snyder, Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Henry Mensch, and Paul Signorelli.  This was our 10th anniversary episode, and we reflected on the topics that have stood out to us, including:

  • The use of shipping containers to create additional space for libraries.
  • The flipped classroom.
  • The personal and professional connections we have made through the show.
  • The fun personal in-person group recordings we used to do.
  • Who has been involved, including guest hosts.  We gave a special shoot out to Julie Strange, who is now a successful small business owner.
  • Maurice’s one-on-one interviews.
  • Providing critique and advice of conferences, training sessions, etc.

You can listen to this 10th anniversary episode on the TalkShoe platform or through places like iTunes.  If you haven’t done so, please leave us a review on iTunes.

Finally, Maurice is looking for guest hosts for the next two episodes (Sept. 28 and Oct. 12). If you’re interested, please contact him!  (His normal guest hosts are tied up.)

Below are a few photos from our 10 years….

T is is for Training Crew ready for lunch

CILDC FireCon

TisforTraining Live from Princeton & Pres4Lib

T is for Training

Book art at the Columbus Public Library (Ohio)On today’s call were Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Maurice Coleman.  We talked about books, etc., that have helped us keep up-to-date on what is happening in our teaching-training-learning industry.

Resources:

After this listening to this show, if you know have a resource to share with us, and the rest of the T is for Training family, please leave a comment!

We’re celebrating our 10th anniversary in two weeks and hope some of our T is for Training colleagues will join us.

King TutOn the call today were Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl and Maurice Coleman.  We did a thought experiment of talking about what the future of our work as trainers-teachers might look like.  This discussion was loosely based on the “in 2035” idea/graphic on Jonathan Nadler’s web site. Questions, which we thought we might consider, were:
  • What will training/teaching look like in 5, 10 or 17 years? (2023, 2028, 2035)  Why?
  • What do trainers – people like us – need to do now to prepare for that new reality?
  • What’s the best cause scenario? Worst case?
However, we spent our time mostly on the first one.
We started by thinking what has changed in the last 17 years?  For example:
  • How people and groups take notes
  • Democratization and sharing of information
  • The language we use, including our use of pronouns

What came up when we thought forward 17 years?

  • How do we scale what we do now? (e.g., note-taking and interacting)
  • How will storytelling – which is a part of training – change?
  • How will people be trained on those assumed skills (e.g., word processing)?
  • Will people be willing to be trained on needed basic skills (which the likely could fake)?
  • Will people maintain their curiosity?
  • And more…

Resources

You can listen to the show online at TalkShoe or through iTunes.  Please skip ahead to the 7:45 mark where the show actually begins.  (A feature of the new TalkShoe is that it begins recording once people have called in, rather than allowing the host to start the recording.)

TalkShoe’s Major Overhaul

TalkShoe has gone through a major overhaul.  When you join us “on the call”, know that you’ll have a bit of a learning curve (and you heard us go through it on the last episode).  The phone number is now 1-605-562-0444, HOWEVER, you can also just use your computer audio, which you may prefer.
The platform now provides a way for us to see each other (video), although that video feed is not capture. The platform does capture the chat text, so we will need to be careful of how we use it as a back channel.  In fact, we may look for another back channel method, since having one has been useful.

10 Years Strong

T is for Training is coming up on its 10th anniversary (around Sept. 13)!  If you haven’t called in recently, please consider popping in on one of these episodes, as we celebrate T’s longevity.  And if you have the email address of anyone else who used to call in, please invite them to join in, too.  Of course, newcomers are ALWAYS welcome!