Posts Tagged ‘Paul Signorelli’

The Pot Of Gold At The End Of My RainbowEpisode 202 was recorded St. Patrick’s Day!  Diane Huckaby, Maurice Coleman, Kate Kosturski, and Paul Signorelli talked Play to Learn (yes, using games), the Congress bromance trip, and incorporating play into your training.  You can listen to the episode here.

 

nmc_itunesu-hrhied17finalIn this episode, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman discussed the 2017 NMC Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition. Paul is one of the folks who helped create the report, and he talked about the process. Then they discuss the report itself and industry ramifications. They made jokes, too.  You can listen to the episode here.

John LewisOn the call were Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, Diane Huckaby, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  We talked about ALA Midwinter and the role of libraries as a place of facts and reliable information.  Libraries – as an institution – can be community beacons.  You can listen to the show here.

We talked about fake web sites, which can test someone’s information literacy skills such as this and this.

We also talked about if there have been changes in the activity levels in public libraries, since the inauguration.  Maurice noted that they are compiling their January statistics now and hopes to report on them during the next show.

Maurice Coleman with his pussyhatFinally, we want to thank those who are willing to engage in conversations and actions, and to bring facts into those conversations.  Also thanks to ALA and other associations for the statements they have issued.  The ALA statement is here.

Our 200th episode will be February 17.  We hope more of our T community will come and help celebrate!

On the call were Maurice Coleman, Kate Kosturski, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Paul Signorelli (three with coughs and one with a “busted” foot).

junkPaul started us off on a conversation about the Communities That Work Partnership Playbook (Nov. 2016), focusing on page 11 (see image).  We focused on “balancing customization and standardization” in terms of training and education.  In self-directed learning, students (and trainers) need to know that the correct skills are being learned which are necessary for the workplace.

Maurice brought up a wonderful image of a honeycomb, where you provide some structure and people are free to then fill-in the structure.

We moved eventually to a long conversation about conference planning and changing from sessions to tracks.  And we ended by talking again about customized learning, with a slight detour on the topic of “ambivert.”  (See “9 Signs That You’re An Ambivert.”)

You can listen to the show here.

Jill's view while on T is for TrainingAfter a hiatus due to the November holidays, the T is for Training crew was back at it for the last show of 2016.  On the call were Maurice Coleman, Andrea Snyder, Paul Signorelli and Jill Hurst-Wahl.  Today’s topic built upon the Association for Talent Development‘s Employee Learning Week and was “who might be a champion of learning?” We began listing job functions and organizations that are champions. We noted that learners can become self-directed champions of learning.  Along the way, we talked about the need for self-care (and referenced both Heather Plett and Episode 163).  Self-care has been a recurring theme, as has been the power of networking. While we are all outstanding networkers, we are not always outstanding in terms of self-care (something which we acknowledged we need to pay more attention to).

Along the way, Paul mentioned the book The Nudge (his last book reference for 2016) and we engaged in a bit of “poking” at each other. Ah friends!

You can hear this episode here.  Paul created a Storify of tweets about our conversation, which can be viewed here.

Our next call will be on January 6, 2017, then on Feb. 3, Feb 17 and Mar. 3.  We’re skipping Jan 20 because many of the T is for Training regulars will be at the ALA Midwinter Conference.

IFLA WLIC2016After a three-minute episode on Sept. 2 (Too Beautiful Outside), the crew bounced back with a full Episode 193. On the call were Andrea Snyder, Diane Huckaby, Paul Signorelli and Maurice Coleman.

Here are links to items mentioned in the show:

You can listen to the entire show here.

A lock with a warning on itThis week, we welcomed Dr. Steve Albrecht, who wrote the book Library Security: Better Communication, Safer Facilities.  Steve is a member of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals and is an ATAP Certified Threat Manager.   He’s on Twitter at @DrSteveAlbrecht.   Also on the call were Maurice Coleman (@baldgeekinmd), Paul Signorelli (@paulsignorelli), Andrea Snyder @alsynder02), Laura Fothergill (@laurafothergill), and Jill Hurst-Wahl (@jill_hw). The show can be heard here.

Why did Steve write this book?  A group knew that he wrote about workplace violence and asked that he think about this topic from a library perspective.  He has done workshops and webinars on the topic.  After a umber of years, he wrote a book on the topic.

What are the three keys to a safer library?

  • An assertive use of the library’s code of conduct.  He believes the code of conduct should be posted and visible.  The language should help people understand what they can do.
  • Create partnership relationships with people in the larger community who can help the library address specific issues (e.g., homelessness).
  • Talk with staff about issues and do training, and group problem solving.  Have an incident reporting system.

Do many libraries have an incident reporting system?  Many do.  the incident report needs to be in a format – and in enough details – to be useful for people inside and outside of the library (e.g., law enforcement).  The law of documentation may stop you from getting the help you need in handling a specific situation.

Is it true that the more urban your library, the more likely you’ll have security concerns?  It doesn’t matter where the facility is. What matters is that the culture has demonstrated what the library will tolerate.  A culture that is inviting and supportive, where people self-police, is best.

Steve noted that people often don’t talk about what has driven them away from the library.  If someone’s behavior has stopped people from coming to the library, you need to know that.

What is your experience with libraries in terms of reaching out to teens?   The library needs to be best people talking to the teens.  “Best” means the person who is aligned with the teens.  It might be someone their age or someone who has a connection with the teens.

Steve cautions to be aware of peer pressure.  Rather than talking to kids as a group, talk to them individually.  Perhaps talk to one, who can take the message back to the other teens.  Also one on one, you might really hear what the problem or situation is.

Steve noted that a security guard’s job is customer service.

What advice does Steve have for helping us work with staff who have challenging patrons?  We know that we have patrons who have idiosyncratic behavior.  How does that person’s behavior impact the business?  The fact that a person is homeless is not the issue; the person’s behavior might be an issue.

What are some key staff do’s or don’ts when dealing with security (challenging patrons)?

  • Have a consistent message.  For example, enforce the code of conduct consistently throughout the week and year.
  • Understand the idea of space and distance.  Give people space and distance.  Be aware of violating someone’s space.  Space can also provide safety.

Does this relate to cultural competency or diversity training?  Steve relates this to the three C’s: consistency, community, and communication.  He noted that diversity training can be a loaded top and so trainers need to be purposeful in how they approach the topic.

Lecturing versus experiential learning?  Steve likes doing both.

In terms of a code of conduct, should it be more do’s or don’ts?  Steve believes it should be more do’s.  If written legalistically, it becomes don’ts.  Turn the language around so it is engaging and is not lecturing.  It should be friendly and short.  People should be able to say what the code is and how it is enforced.

What should be considered a threat?  Maurice noted that some staff members don’t know what a threat is.  There is research into who makes threats versus who carries out threats.  There are people who are howler, who make a lot of noise and who are verbally provocative.  Then there are hunters, who are rare, who will do the the most damage.  We run into howlers much more frequently than hunters.  A concern are those people who tell a third party and make an indirect threat.  He is more concerned about indirect threats versus direct threat.  However, Steve noted that being aware of all threats – direct or indirect – is important and assessing them.

When a howler is confronted and expresses remorse, that is a good thing.  A howler who is not remorseful could be problematic.

Should sites have their facilities assessed for security?  Yes.  Use a checklist or have the police do a walk through. You do not necessarily need to hire a security consultant.

Steve believes in a delineated barrier between the staff and patron side of the building.

How do you confront someone?  Do it in pairs, so that you have someone to support you and to be a witness.

Steve Albrecht said much more than what is captured here.  You can here the entire show on Talkshoe.

Lake Eola Classic ViewJules Shore, Maurice Coleman and Paul Signorelli talked about the ALA Annual Conference in Orlando, our favorite things and takeaways about the conference.  You can listen to the show here.

Inspiration or distraction?

Inspiration or Distraction?

This week’s topic was inspired by the blog post “Attention, distraction, deep work and burnout” by Jill.  On the call were Buffy Hamilton, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Laura Fothergill and Maurice Coleman.

Buffy noted that some K-12 school districts do allow students to bring their own devices into the classroom.  However, she did notice some students this past year who became very engrossed in their mobile devices during lunch and never did anything else during lunchtime.

One other distraction is when people monopolize the conversation.  See “What teens resent: Classrooms controlled by students rather than teachers“.

Paul pointed to his post Social Media Feast and Fast: Disconnecting for a Day.

We talked about distraction in library training, K-12, and higher education.  Paul and Laura provided tools that people can use for digital note-taking which include Twitter, Prezi,  OneNote, and Sway…and a myriad of other things.

The show – which contains much more than what’s in these notes – can be listened to here.  The unedited chat – or as we say…the back channel – from the show is here.  Paul felt that others might want to read the chat, which was very focused this week.

Additional Resources:

Revolutionize Learning & Development. (2014). San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons and ASTD Press

Clark Quinn 

Quinn--Revolutionize_L&D--CoverClark Quinn is certainly not the first to say he is mad as hell and to urge us to not take it anymore. But in this well-researched, highly- and finely-nuanced book, he does far more than recycle old rants. He builds upon research-based evidence to show where we continue to go wrong in talent development and, more importantly, offers suggestions for changing our course(s) to the benefit of those we serve. The real winners here are the learners we will better support by adapting Quinn’s first-rate recommendations to fit our learners’ and organizations’ needs.

–This brief review, originally written as a “shelf talker” posted in the conference bookstore at the ATD 2016 International Conference & Exposition in Denver (May 2016), is re-posted here with the permission of our ATD colleagues. A longer set of reflections is available on the “Building Creative Bridges” blog.