@TisForTraining 320: Doodley Squat. Yeah that is the title.

Punya MishraTonight we were joined by Punya Mishra, who is the Associate Dean of Scholarship & Innovation & Professor at Arizona State University and a contributor to the Silver Lining for Learning podcast and blog. We jumped right in to talking about education technology.

Punya and Maurice Coleman noted that we’ve gotten away from thinking that education technology is sexy, and are focusing on the theory of learning, benefits of using technology, and the pitfalls. We wandered through related topics, including the work Punya is doing at ASU. He brings his background in design to this work.

The Silver Lining Podcast started early in the COVID pandemic to interview educators. The podcast grew out of the blog post “What If Schools Are Closed for More than a Year Due to the New Coronavirus (COVID-19)?” The podcast is focused on the potential and real silver linings of education during the pandemic. He noted that is we design the education system correctly, it will be resilient, and that is an important point regarding education during the pandemic.

Great quote, “a large part of education is about becoming.”

Another quote, “I want [students] to remember that they’re not alone; if they need to know something, they’re surrounded by people and resources who can help them.”

We had a fascinating conversation about how do you put more topics into a student’s education, which is often what educators are asked to do. Punya said we should ask students five years after the class what they remember. Do they remember what we want? Can we then design our courses and programs around 5+/- things we want them to learn? Then connect everything to those things.  Maurice summarized this as:

Capture > Remix > Release

 

Besides Punya and Maurice, also on the call tonight were Paul Signorelli, Tom Haymes, Diane Hackabay, Ruben Puentedura, and Jill Hurst-Wahl.

Resources
Upcoming Episodes
  • Show 321 – October 6
  • Show 322 – October 20
  • Show 323 -November 10
  • Nov. 24 – No Show Thanksgiving (THANK YOU ALL!)
  • Show 324 – December 8
  • No show again until January due to the December holidays

@TisForTraining 319: No Messiahs

Ruben PuenteduraTonight the crew – Diane Huckabay, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, Tom Haymes, and Maurice Coleman – was joined by Dr. Ruben Puentedura. Ruben “is the Founder and President of Hippasus, a consulting firm based in Western Massachusetts, focusing on transformative applications of information technologies to education.”

Ruben started by giving us an overview of his work.  He has worked around the world and through that work has seen different patterns emerge as he has worked with different educational institutions. In an overview of his work and what he has been hearing, he mentioned anti-fragility, learn from learning, learn from what you have experienced, credentialing processes used in academia, and exploration of new paths into existing planning.  He then discussed the lack of portable water in Jackson, MS, and how that situation could benefit from what people are doing/learning in other countries. His final examples – before we began Q&A – was to talk about the change in student test scores during the COVID pandemic. Ruben is focused on how people think through these situations. While we cannot transfer what one group did to another situation, we can learn from how people think in specific situations.

And after a very interesting introduction to all this (above) from Ruben, the group began to discuss and ask questions. During our conversation we noted that data is boring and so telling stories is important. Our stories need to be data informed. As Diane said, “The stories contribute meaning.” Metaphors are important.

How do we teach organizations to be failure tolerant and take risks? We need cultures that are willing to try new things, create communities of practice, and learn from what they are doing. Success organizations are willing to talk about what works and doesn’t work, and learn from that. The organizations must have innovation as a shared value.

You can listen to this episode on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcast episodes.

Resources

Nassim Nicholas Nicholas Taleb. (2014) Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder. (paid link)

Tom Haymes. (2021) Designing Antifragile Learning Systems.

Tom Haymes. (2021) Making Our Learning Networks Antifragile.

@TisForTraining 318: Don’t Be the Unripe Apple

The crew on August 25With school starting again (K-12, college & university) and the continued presence of other training opportunities, we decided to talk about how we ensure everyone is welcome in that learning space (classroom or virtual space).  On the call were Henry Mensch, Paul Signorelli, Jill Hurst-Wahl, and Maurice Coleman.

The questions we used to focus the conversation were:

  • What do we do before the class to set “the stage”?
    • Know your presentation tool.
    • Send out reminder emails about the training.
    • Do a welcoming upfront with the “lay of the land”, e.g., where are the handouts, etc.
    • Give people the ability to reset the room to create a better learning space. This gives people ownership of the space.
    • Create a circle of trust in the room.
    • Remember that you are on stage. No matter how you feel, you need to be engaging. Your teaching is a performance.
    • Learn something about improv, because having improvisation skills can be very helpful for a trainer.
  • What do we do during the class to ensure all learners are welcome and feel as if they belong there?
    • Create a circle of trust in the room.
    • Use time before the class begins to understand if there is a need to be addressed, e.g., need to sit closer to the speaker.
    • Talk to the participants when they enter.
  • Priya Parker says we should understand the purpose of an event. How do we use that purpose to create a welcoming environment?
    • Set the purpose early. It should be part of the upfront information.
    • Do people need to do pre-work?
    • Tell people why they should be there. Is it mandatory? Is it for people who do specific work?
    • Have learning objectives.
    • Recognize that you are facilitating a training and understand how to use your facilitation skills.
    • Connect the stated purpose to current events.
    • “Working backward from an outcome can be helpful.” – Priya Parker, p. 24.
  • Tips for working with an interpreter (e.g., American Sign Language)?
      • Slow down your presentation, e.g., pause at the end of a thought to give the interpreter time to catch-up.
      • Talk loud and clear.
      • Because of the translation, recognize that you might not get your entire point across. (In other words, something might get lost in translation.)
      • Give a preview of the topic to the interpreter.
      • Chat with the interpreter ahead of time, if possible.
      • Recognize that the interpreter may need to ask clarifying questions.
      • Use plain, non-jargon language.
      • Ask the interpreter if you need to do something differently.
      • Provide notes to the learner, so they know what was covered (and may help fill-in the blanks).  This could also become you providing notes to all students or you asking a different student each class to provide a short summary of what the class was about. This can be useful to all of the learners.

This was a lively, focused conversation with more tips than what are in the notes! Clearly there is SO much more we could have talked about, so this was just a “dip of the toe” into the topic.

You can listen to the entire episode on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcasts.

@TisForTraining 317: A Big Mess Sorted

ATD HandbookTonight we talked about the  ATD’s Handbook for Training and Development with Tonya Wilson,Elaine Biech, Rita Bailey, Maurice Coleman, Paul Signorelli, Tom Haymes, and Jill Hurst-Wahl. We started with a brief history of this book – the third edition – which has over 100 contributors.

Elaine, the editor, divided the book into eight sections:

    • Section I: The Foundations of Learning and Development
    •  Section II: Planning a Career in Talent Development
    • Section III: Training and Development Basics
    • Section IV: Enhancing and Supporting Talent Development
    • Section V: Required Forward-Focused Proficiencies and Attitudes
    • Section VI: Expanded Roles of Talent Development
    • Section VII: Aligning the Learning Function to the Organization
    • Section VIII: Talent Development’s Role for Future Success

Here is a link to the 82-page sample “chapter.”

In talking about the book, we began focusing on the topic of diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice which is throughout the book. Elaine noted that the theme of diversity includes the diversity of authors. (A result of equity should be fairness, a.k.a., justice.)

The book contains a ton of resources, which could led into much more reading and learning.  While a person could do a deep, prolonged dive into the topics, it can also be used for just in time learning.

We always enjoying having Rita, Tonya, and Elaine on the show! To listen to their wisdom, listen to the episode on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcasts.

@TisForTraining 316: Dust On Your Feet

On the call were T regulars – Maurice Coleman, Angie Fickert Paterek, Paul Signorelli, and Tom Haymes – along with Imani Dlamini and Tula Dlamini (both in South Africa) and Lisa Koster (Canada). Lisa, Imani, Tula, Tom, and Paul led us in a discussion on how ShapingEDU has been capturing “what we have seen teacher-trainer-learners do in response to the coronavirus pandemic.” They talked about the concept behind the project, how they are gathering information, and how they want to disseminate the results. And yes…we talked about what the interviews have taught them!
Thanks to Imani and Tula for joining us at 3 a.m. South Africa Standard Time!
You can listen to this excellent episode at TalkShoe and wherever you get your podcasts.
Resources

@TisForTraining 315: Whip Out Your Flame Thrower

View of pond and Seneca LakeOn the “call” were Maurice Coleman, Angie Fickert Paterek, Paul Signorelli, Clark Quinn, Tom Haymes, and Jill Hurst-Wahl. (Great to have Angie back after a long absence!) The topic this week was conferences. Yes, we have ventured to conference in-person and online, and wanted to share our thoughts about them.

Since these notes are minimal, be sure to listen to the entire episode for the details and wisdom.

Resources

@TisForTraining 314: Colorado’s Switzerland

Old City architecture in Geneva SwitzerlandTonight Maurice Coleman was joined by Jill Hurst-Wahl, Paul Signorelli, and Pat Wagner.  With Pat retiring from her consulting practice at year’s end, we are continuing to ask her about career and background.

We began our conversation with a question about the Office for Open Network, a research group she formed with her spouse.  Besides research, she connected people who needed information to an information source. Over time, Pat built a Rolodex™ of over 5000 people through this work. It was, in essence, an open marketplace of ideas.

Pat worked to meet the client at the point of need and that led to a lot of conversation! And that led to MORE conversation and it was delightful!

We’re thankful for the time with Pat and the conversation. She’s an excellent storyteller and is a person full of wisdom. You will definitely learn from this episode!

In two weeks on July 14, we’ll be talking about the conferences we’ve attended thus far in 2022. Join us for what will definitely be a lively exchange!

@TisForTraining 313: Cover Your Assets

Clark QuinnToday Jill Hurst-Wahl, Tom Haymes, Diane Huckabay, Paul Signorelli, Maurice Coleman, and Henry Mensch gathered to talk to Clark Quinn about his new book, Make It Meaningful: Taking Learning Design From Instructional to Transformational. Clark recently offered the following intro to the book on his Learnlets blog:

Learning Experience Design is, as author Clark Quinn puts it, about “the elegant integration of learning science with engagement”. While there are increasing resources available on the learning science side, the other side is somewhat neglected. Having written one of the books on the learning science side, Clark has undertaken to write the other half. The book is grounded in his early experience writing learning games, then researching cognition and engagement, and ongoing exploration and application of learning, technology, and design to creating solutions and strategies. It covers the underlying principles including surprise, story, and emotion and pulls them together to create a coherent approach. The book also covers not just the principles, but the implications for both learning elements and a design process. With concise prose and concrete examples, this book provides the framework to take your learning experience designs from instructional to transformational!
We talked about some of the myths of learning science, as well as ways of making learning meaningful. Clark focused on the emotional experience of the learners. That emotional experience helps the learning to occur. Of course, the topic of storytelling came up and its role in learning, as well as starting with the end in mind.
Clark’s book, Make It Meaningful, is available wherever you purchase your books, including Amazon (paid link) and independent booksellers.
You can listen to this episode on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcast episodes.

@TisForTraining 311: Digital Humanity is Choice and Voice

Tom HaymesToday we talked with T is for Training regular, Tom Haymes, about his book, Discovering Digital Humanity: A Practical Guide to Creativity and Innovation in the Digital Age or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Technology (2022). Also on the call were Maurice Coleman, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Henry Mensch, and Paul Signorelli.

We spent an hour talking about print books, ebooks, radio, television, printing presses, and so much more. Impossible to capture notes, so listen to the episode on TalkShoe or wherever you get your podcasts.

Book description:

There is no denying that we’re experiencing an unprecedented rate of technological change. This change has resulted in everything moving faster and in a more distributed fashion. Societies, organizations and individuals are struggling to find new equilibria. The missing element is how we fit into the picture. Breathless pronouncements of how technology will change the world focus too much on the technology and not enough on how humans can develop skillsets to help them navigate rapid changes in communication and computation. What we discover time and time again is that there’s really nothing new under the sun. Humans will use technology to fight, to love, to create, and to explore. Discovering Digital Humanity is designed to be a practical guide for organizations, teachers, leaders, and learners to think and rethink how they are using digital tools to achieve positive and profitable outcomes.

Tom’s book is published by ATBOSH Media and available through, Amazon (paid link) and other booksellers. Also check WorldCat to see if you can borrow it from your local library.

On Tom’s website, he is currently talking about 25 Books Every Technologist Should Read, which he mentioned during our discussion.